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Comments Log

Many people are making comments on different posts and pages. I discovered that some of these comments are very beneficial and should be highlighted or summarized on one page. I was hoping that my blog with be able to do this automatically but unfortunately it does not. However I will copy some comments that I feel are useful in this section. Therefore check back regularly. The following comments were sent to me either by email directly or were posted on one of my blog entries.


 

Ryan Hoffmann

107.77.85.33

Submitted on 2014/11/03 at 6:55 pm

I elected to have PRC surgery after being told all the tendons were torn in my left wrist and were beyond repair. I’m heavy into working out and knew this would greatly affect my performance. Almost 3 yrs out and I’m still unable to perform floor push-ups(did up to 250 per day 2x/week), and flat bench bar and a variety of other routine exercises. I strictly stick to DBs for chest and a lot of other exercises as its less painful. I have been slowly inching up to the 100lb DBs for chest but its been a long process. Overall I’m happy with surgical outcome bc the other intense pain is no longer an issue. Advice: if you box wrap your hands&wrists!!! This is where I believe I tore all my hand tendons. Any ?’s regarding PRC surgery feel free to email me. Cnfzednlife@yahoo.com. Ryan

I elected to have PRC surgery after being told all the tendons were torn in my left wrist and were beyond repair. I’m heavy into working out and knew this would greatly affect my performance. Almost 3 yrs out and I’m still unable to perform floor push-ups(did up to 250 per day 2x/week), and flat bench bar and a variety of other routine exercises. I strictly stick to DBs for chest and a lot of other exercises as its less painful. I have been slowly inching up to the 100lb DBs for chest but its been a long process. Overall I’m happy with surgical outcome bc the other intense pain is no longer an issue. Advice: if you box wrap your hands&wrists!!! This is where I believe I tore all my hand tendons. Any ?’s regarding PRC surgery feel free to email me. Cnfzednlife@yahoo.com. Ryan

Cnfzednlife@yahoo.com

Ryan Hoffmann

Cathy

96.249.253.34

Submitted on 2014/11/03 at 4:31 pm

Hi all fellow PRC candidates and graduates,
I am scheduled for one this Dec 2014…I am confused and frightened. For those of you who have gone through this what would be your suggestion as far as taking short term disability? I am a software developer like Peter and depend very much on my right dominant hand. Would you suggest 2 weeks? Here is the kicker…if they get in there and find that a PRC may not work then they will fuse it right then and there…yea…how nice! So do I prepare for 2 weeks or 4 weeks if they do a fusion.

What a great site you have created for us who have this prognosis. I thank you very much Peter.

Hi all fellow PRC candidates and graduates, I am scheduled for one this Dec 2014…I am confused and frightened. For those of you who have gone through this what would be your suggestion as far as taking short term disability? I am a software developer like Peter and depend very much on my right dominant hand. Would you suggest 2 weeks? Here is the kicker…if they get in there and find that a PRC may not work then they will fuse it right then and there…yea…how nice! So do I prepare for 2 weeks or 4 weeks if they do a fusion. What a great site you have created for us who have this prognosis. I thank you very much Peter.

trevisam@gmail.com

Cathy

Pam
Facebook
174.63.73.223

Submitted on 2014/10/31 at 4:39 pm

Hi there,thank you for the posting, I In January and tore the cartiledge off my lunate,I had orthroscopic surgery for debriedment with no pain relief, I have had three doctors opinions all the same proximal carpectomy,however one doc says try everything first from acupuncture to pycotherepy and evan suggested drinking apple cider vinegar and water ( an old remedy,) I am young 51 and active and worry about long term effects of not doing the surgery with day to day pain that consumes you., I don’t drink or take drugs.. Losing 50% of my motion seems difficult but with the pain I have now, I don’t even have 50 %. Motion. Your site has helped me understand a bit more of what to expect,thank you.

Hi there,thank you for the posting, I In January and tore the cartiledge off my lunate,I had orthroscopic surgery for debriedment with no pain relief, I have had three doctors opinions all the same proximal carpectomy,however one doc says try everything first from acupuncture to pycotherepy and evan suggested drinking apple cider vinegar and water ( an old remedy,) I am young 51 and active and worry about long term effects of not doing the surgery with day to day pain that consumes you., I don’t drink or take drugs.. Losing 50% of my motion seems difficult but with the pain I have now, I don’t even have 50 %. Motion. Your site has helped me understand a bit more of what to expect,thank you.

bass4me2@yahoo.com

Pam

http://Facebook

steve
69.35.179.248

Submitted on 2014/10/29 at 10:36 am

I had the PRC surgery on Oct the 23rd, now it’s day 6, still much pain in simple movements. I do have a follow up on Nov. 5th. Really frustrated at this point simply because I am very impatient. I live in southern Indiana and had the surgery conducted in Louisville at Norton’s. If anyone has had the same, either recent or earlier, please e-mail me with your progress at svatsula@yahoo.com for I do not really know what lays ahead. Thank you

I had the PRC surgery on Oct the 23rd, now it’s day 6, still much pain in simple movements. I do have a follow up on Nov. 5th. Really frustrated at this point simply because I am very impatient. I live in southern Indiana and had the surgery conducted in Louisville at Norton’s. If anyone has had the same, either recent or earlier, please e-mail me with your progress at svatsula@yahoo.com for I do not really know what lays ahead. Thank you

svatsula@yahoo.com

steve

Amanda
96.225.59.62

Submitted on 2014/10/12 at 11:58 pm

I just had a PRC on October 2nd because my lunate collapsed and fragmented. After surgery I was in a lot of pain and it woke me up in the middle of the night for about two days. The swelling has gone down a lot, but my fingers are still very bruised. I was placed in a removable cast last Tuesday and I am getting the stitches out this coming Tuesday. The recovery has been very difficult for me because I use a wheelchair for mobility and I cannot use my hands for at least another two weeks. I need help with everything I do and it is frustrating.

I just had a PRC on October 2nd because my lunate collapsed and fragmented. After surgery I was in a lot of pain and it woke me up in the middle of the night for about two days. The swelling has gone down a lot, but my fingers are still very bruised. I was placed in a removable cast last Tuesday and I am getting the stitches out this coming Tuesday. The recovery has been very difficult for me because I use a wheelchair for mobility and I cannot use my hands for at least another two weeks. I need help with everything I do and it is frustrating.

manda5786@verizon.net

Amanda

Billy HO
67.188.251.62

Submitted on 2014/10/12 at 3:38 pm | In reply to Chet.

I am a scratch golfer who had a PRC in my right wrist so yes you will be able to play.
My shot making is not what it used to be but I believe my short game is better maybe because I hit fewer greens now. I am 57 and play or practice five days a week.

I am a scratch golfer who had a PRC in my right wrist so yes you will be able to play. My shot making is not what it used to be but I believe my short game is better maybe because I hit fewer greens now. I am 57 and play or practice five days a week.

Billyhogolf@yahoo.com

Billy HO

scott

173.209.211.222

Submitted on 2014/09/30 at 7:14 am | In reply to Dave.

Hey Dave,
The pain in my wrist really wasn’t severe. It would start to ache if I used it a lot. It always seemed like it was healing and then it would end up slowly coming back. It wasn’t until the other wrist started hurting that I decided I better get them looked at. I was floored when the Dr told me how screwed up my wrists were. I was expecting mild carnal tunnel or tendonitous

Hey Dave, The pain in my wrist really wasn’t severe. It would start to ache if I used it a lot. It always seemed like it was healing and then it would end up slowly coming back. It wasn’t until the other wrist started hurting that I decided I better get them looked at. I was floored when the Dr told me how screwed up my wrists were. I was expecting mild carnal tunnel or tendonitous

swillecke42@gmail.com

scott

Dave

174.241.240.133

Submitted on 2014/09/29 at 8:29 pm | In reply to Scott Chapman.

Scott, did you have severe pain in your wrist as well as in the base of your thumb? My dr claims I will be relieved of all the aches and pains after PRC
Thanks

Scott, did you have severe pain in your wrist as well as in the base of your thumb? My dr claims I will be relieved of all the aches and pains after PRC Thanks

Dave.alt@crown.com

Dave

Scott Chapman
https://www.facebook.com/exsanguinate
70.117.15.213

Submitted on 2014/09/29 at 5:23 pm

I’m just over a year post surgery and I can tell you it was NOT a short recovery. The surgeon says I have better results than expected, but still about half of the mobility I once had. I too had an old injury that I never had checked out and my surgery was a direct result of stupidity. If you have pain in your wrist (even only sometimes), get it checked out! My grip strength is still very minimal, but would probably be better if I worked it out more. I would say it took almost a full year to get to where my wrist really felt fully healed. The pain is gone, but you’ll always have that feeling of it not being quite right. I also get aches before storms.

I’m just over a year post surgery and I can tell you it was NOT a short recovery. The surgeon says I have better results than expected, but still about half of the mobility I once had. I too had an old injury that I never had checked out and my surgery was a direct result of stupidity. If you have pain in your wrist (even only sometimes), get it checked out! My grip strength is still very minimal, but would probably be better if I worked it out more. I would say it took almost a full year to get to where my wrist really felt fully healed. The pain is gone, but you’ll always have that feeling of it not being quite right. I also get aches before storms.

scott@lovemetenderbbq.com

Scott Chapman

https://www.facebook.com/exsanguinate

Janie
permalink
71.97.118.177

Submitted on 2014/09/26 at 3:46 pm

Well, I am up against all of this now too. I currently have lots of pain in my wrist – but still have full motion in my hands and fingers (at this time). I have been told I have a intrasseous cyst in the distal pole of the scaphoid bone. Along with 5-6 mm space in the scapholunate area. So I have been told my options could be a full scaphoid exision, a 4 corner fusion or a PRC. None of these sound good to me at all. I wonder what would happen if I did nothing. I have read all the comments above about PRC and some sound promising some not so much.
Any words of advise.

Well, I am up against all of this now too. I currently have lots of pain in my wrist – but still have full motion in my hands and fingers (at this time). I have been told I have a intrasseous cyst in the distal pole of the scaphoid bone. Along with 5-6 mm space in the scapholunate area. So I have been told my options could be a full scaphoid exision, a 4 corner fusion or a PRC. None of these sound good to me at all. I wonder what would happen if I did nothing. I have read all the comments above about PRC and some sound promising some not so much. Any words of advise.

janie@savephace.com

Janie

http://permalink

Joe
66.87.73.78

Submitted on 2014/09/24 at 3:20 pm | In reply to Josh Huffman.

My name is Joe, 34 yrs old. I had the PRC done back in 2007. Initially a had broken my Scaphoid and they did a bone graft to it. 2 yrs later they found that the graft didn’t fuse and was systic and disintegrating.
Recently I injured the same wrist. They found that my radial and ulnar tips and wrist bones were severely compacted and eroding. The surgeon I spoke with told me to GET ANOTHER JOB.(I do manual labor and work out) He also said that PRC is not meant for people who do laborious work.
With regard to strength it’ll never be as strong as it was because your hand will be shorter than your ligaments. But managed to get pretty close, although it’ll take some time.
You’ll be able to do your job but you’ll end up like me. If you decide to continue with your job ALWAYS wear a brace…they didn’t tell me that part.
I still have some yrs left on it before I have to get a full fusion. How long depends on what I do.

My name is Joe, 34 yrs old. I had the PRC done back in 2007. Initially a had broken my Scaphoid and they did a bone graft to it. 2 yrs later they found that the graft didn’t fuse and was systic and disintegrating. Recently I injured the same wrist. They found that my radial and ulnar tips and wrist bones were severely compacted and eroding. The surgeon I spoke with told me to GET ANOTHER JOB.(I do manual labor and work out) He also said that PRC is not meant for people who do laborious work. With regard to strength it’ll never be as strong as it was because your hand will be shorter than your ligaments. But managed to get pretty close, although it’ll take some time. You’ll be able to do your job but you’ll end up like me. If you decide to continue with your job ALWAYS wear a brace…they didn’t tell me that part. I still have some yrs left on it before I have to get a full fusion. How long depends on what I do.

augreich@yahoo.com

Joe

Tina Taverna

72.218.73.203

Submitted on 2014/09/23 at 10:43 am

Please let me know if any of you have used the Dragon software and if so, did you use Dragon 11.5? Thanks
Tina Taverna

Please let me know if any of you have used the Dragon software and if so, did you use Dragon 11.5? Thanks Tina Taverna

travelwithtina1@cox.net

Tina Taverna

Tina Taverna

72.218.73.203

Submitted on 2014/09/19 at 6:07 am

I am a travel agent and so typing is a good part of my daily schedule. I am now ready to purchase the Dragon software but when I go online, there is a lot to choose from. Any suggestions as to what you used? Thanks for answering my questions on driving, PT and best is the great bottle of wine 🙂 Thanks for putting this blog together as it is very helpful.
Tina Taverna

I am a travel agent and so typing is a good part of my daily schedule. I am now ready to purchase the Dragon software but when I go online, there is a lot to choose from. Any suggestions as to what you used? Thanks for answering my questions on driving, PT and best is the great bottle of wine 🙂 Thanks for putting this blog together as it is very helpful. Tina Taverna

travelwithtina1@cox.net

Tina Taverna

Paul
70.193.0.119

Submitted on 2014/09/17 at 8:23 am | In reply to scott.

Scott, My problem also came as an after effect from an old injury, but got worse when I decided to build s a house at 67. I postponed the PRC surgery and now I’m going for the 4 point fusion instead.
Thiey say this will give me some use of my newly stiffend right wrist,, they say pain free.
Had I done the PRC a year ago I would’t have finished my house and still been on light duty for the rest of my life. Couldn’t handle that,and now will have a longer recovery period and hope I won’t regret waiting.

Scott, My problem also came as an after effect from an old injury, but got worse when I decided to build s a house at 67. I postponed the PRC surgery and now I’m going for the 4 point fusion instead. Thiey say this will give me some use of my newly stiffend right wrist,, they say pain free. Had I done the PRC a year ago I would’t have finished my house and still been on light duty for the rest of my life. Couldn’t handle that,and now will have a longer recovery period and hope I won’t regret waiting.

PaulDobbin@aol.con

Paul

scott

174.255.96.4

Submitted on 2014/09/16 at 9:37 am

I had the prc done in July on the right and will be having the left one done after that heals. So far, not sure how I feel about the surgery but the hand is feeling more “normal” daily. The best way I can described what it felt like for me was a “blob”. It felt dead but being 2 months out now, it does feel a lot better. Don’t like that I have to have these surgeries since I’m only 44 but it is what it is.

My hands were injured at work from all the stress put on them from yrs of concrete work. Dr says I will never be able to do this work again. Also will never play guitar again and am pretty bitter.

All I can say to ppl who need this surgery is that for me, it wasn’t noticed right away because I wasn’t in extreme pain except when I worked but since I tried working and ignoring the dull ache, it cost me some wrist movement. The prc is a salvage procedure and for some ppl, the longer they wait, the less movement they will have.

Glad I found this site and will keep checking back, answer any questions if I can and appreciate all the ppl sharing their experience going through the same journey

I had the prc done in July on the right and will be having the left one done after that heals. So far, not sure how I feel about the surgery but the hand is feeling more "normal" daily. The best way I can described what it felt like for me was a "blob". It felt dead but being 2 months out now, it does feel a lot better. Don’t like that I have to have these surgeries since I’m only 44 but it is what it is. My hands were injured at work from all the stress put on them from yrs of concrete work. Dr says I will never be able to do this work again. Also will never play guitar again and am pretty bitter. All I can say to ppl who need this surgery is that for me, it wasn’t noticed right away because I wasn’t in extreme pain except when I worked but since I tried working and ignoring the dull ache, it cost me some wrist movement. The prc is a salvage procedure and for some ppl, the longer they wait, the less movement they will have. Glad I found this site and will keep checking back, answer any questions if I can and appreciate all the ppl sharing their experience going through the same journey

swillecke42@gmail.com

scott

Peter B

65.190.167.182

Submitted on 2014/09/16 at 8:26 am

So here I am, 71/2 months post PRC (Jan 31). Doc did carpal tunnel release surgery on May 15 because of persistent numbness in my fingers. Had EMG/Nerve Conduction testing two weeks ago which showed minimal (read near zero) nerve conduction to my index and middle fingers and to my thumb. Also I had dexterity and sensitivity testing just yesterday which showed zero feeling in my index and middle fingers and very little in my thumb. Ring and little finger were near normal. Dexterity was horrendous and grip strength barely half that of the left hand.

I refer to January 31st as “…a day which will live in infamy…” and I’m convinced that it was a mistake to have the surgery in the first place. Cut it off – I think It’d be not a lot worse.

So here I am, 71/2 months post PRC (Jan 31). Doc did carpal tunnel release surgery on May 15 because of persistent numbness in my fingers. Had EMG/Nerve Conduction testing two weeks ago which showed minimal (read near zero) nerve conduction to my index and middle fingers and to my thumb. Also I had dexterity and sensitivity testing just yesterday which showed zero feeling in my index and middle fingers and very little in my thumb. Ring and little finger were near normal. Dexterity was horrendous and grip strength barely half that of the left hand. I refer to January 31st as "…a day which will live in infamy…" and I’m convinced that it was a mistake to have the surgery in the first place. Cut it off – I think It’d be not a lot worse.

psbraleigh@yahoo.com

Peter B

Dave

174.251.3.13

Submitted on 2014/09/14 at 1:16 pm

Ha anyone had the PRC with prior aching pain in the base of the thumb, and the pain completely gone After the PRC?

Ha anyone had the PRC with prior aching pain in the base of the thumb, and the pain completely gone After the PRC?

Dave.alt@crown.com

Dave

walaba1957
walaba1957.wordpress.com

166.205.68.49

Submitted on 2014/09/05 at 3:38 pm | In reply to walaba1957.

That’s Keinbock@yahoogroup.com
Sorry

That’s Keinbock@yahoogroup.com Sorry

ladeckernurse@yahoo.com

walaba1957

http://walaba1957.wordpress.com

walaba1957
walaba1957.wordpress.com

166.205.68.49

Submitted on 2014/09/05 at 3:34 pm | In reply to Andrew.

Kienbockgroup@yahoo.com
Great site

Kienbockgroup@yahoo.com Great site

ladeckernurse@yahoo.com

walaba1957

http://walaba1957.wordpress.com

walaba1957
walaba1957.wordpress.com

166.205.68.17

Submitted on 2014/09/05 at 3:27 pm | In reply to Jan.

I had the denervation done to help with the pain. In some aspects it has but, I still take pain medication on a daily basis. I have developed arthritis in my wrist & some of my finger joints. I find wearing a Tommie Copper hand glove while I’m working helps.

I had the denervation done to help with the pain. In some aspects it has but, I still take pain medication on a daily basis. I have developed arthritis in my wrist & some of my finger joints. I find wearing a Tommie Copper hand glove while I’m working helps.

ladeckernurse@yahoo.com

walaba1957

http://walaba1957.wordpress.com

Dave

206.51.157.254

Submitted on 2014/09/04 at 9:27 pm | In reply to Peter Sanderson.

Maria/Peter, I had my scaphoid and lunate replaced from bone out of my hip 31 years ago. I had a pin going through the base of my thumb by my wrist. The base of my thumb has a dull acke that just won’t go away. After my surgery (31 yrs ago) I lost most movement in my wrist. I have not been back to an Orthopedic surgeon since my surgery and have been putting up with the pain. I had my first visit in June 2014 and the surgeon recommended PRC, because he said the bones have been dead and the surgery probably never actually successful because the bones were dead with no blood flow. At times, I cannot remove a plastic screw cap off a gallon of milk. Thanks

Maria/Peter, I had my scaphoid and lunate replaced from bone out of my hip 31 years ago. I had a pin going through the base of my thumb by my wrist. The base of my thumb has a dull acke that just won’t go away. After my surgery (31 yrs ago) I lost most movement in my wrist. I have not been back to an Orthopedic surgeon since my surgery and have been putting up with the pain. I had my first visit in June 2014 and the surgeon recommended PRC, because he said the bones have been dead and the surgery probably never actually successful because the bones were dead with no blood flow. At times, I cannot remove a plastic screw cap off a gallon of milk. Thanks

dave.alt@crown.com

Dave

Peter Sanderson
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/09/04 at 8:15 am | In reply to Maria.

The real problem with a PRC is that it is part science and part luck. Once the surgeons do their best to remove the bones, the body and how you use your hands will decides where the remaining bones settle in place. Often they do not settle in a totally pain free way such as with me. I have an issue with a fragment that is rubbing against the base of my thumb. This causes me a stiffness and sometimes soreness but it is not sore that I have to take painkillers. More like it goes from loose to stiff. I have rode 8,000 Km this summer so far. Being able to ride was one of my goals. I do get sore at times but it goes away quickly without any painkillers.

Now I have to decide with the doctor if I want to have him grind down the bone in the thumb that is rubbing. Again there is no guarantee. After he fixes that, the bones could settle in a good, same or worse way.

The real problem with a PRC is that it is part science and part luck. Once the surgeons do their best to remove the bones, the body and how you use your hands will decides where the remaining bones settle in place. Often they do not settle in a totally pain free way such as with me. I have an issue with a fragment that is rubbing against the base of my thumb. This causes me a stiffness and sometimes soreness but it is not sore that I have to take painkillers. More like it goes from loose to stiff. I have rode 8,000 Km this summer so far. Being able to ride was one of my goals. I do get sore at times but it goes away quickly without any painkillers. Now I have to decide with the doctor if I want to have him grind down the bone in the thumb that is rubbing. Again there is no guarantee. After he fixes that, the bones could settle in a good, same or worse way.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Maria

87.93.82.4

Submitted on 2014/09/04 at 7:57 am | In reply to Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner.

Dave, may I ask, what kind of pain do you have in your thumb? I have recently been experiencing momentarily some sharp pain in the base of my thumb. I thought i was just something else. Can you try to describe your pain?

Dave, may I ask, what kind of pain do you have in your thumb? I have recently been experiencing momentarily some sharp pain in the base of my thumb. I thought i was just something else. Can you try to describe your pain?

maria.holmstrom@outlook.com

Maria

Dave

174.241.241.64

Submitted on 2014/09/02 at 10:43 pm | In reply to Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner.

I am concerned with the extreme pain in the base of my thumb. Dr says the pain will go away after prc, any advise

I am concerned with the extreme pain in the base of my thumb. Dr says the pain will go away after prc, any advise

Dave.alt@crown.com

Dave

Tina Taverna

72.218.73.203

Submitted on 2014/08/17 at 1:18 pm | In reply to Peter Sanderson.

I do have a sports car that is a standard and that will be put aside for a while. I meant driving my van with the cast as I was told it would be on for about 6 weeks and that is when I am concerned about turning the wheel with just my left hand?

I do have a sports car that is a standard and that will be put aside for a while. I meant driving my van with the cast as I was told it would be on for about 6 weeks and that is when I am concerned about turning the wheel with just my left hand?

travelwithtina1@cox.net

Tina Taverna

Peter Sanderson
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/08/17 at 12:51 pm

get a few great bottles of wine, you may need them before and after the bicycle trip (LOL). Driving is not an issue unless you have a standard. I was driving a standard after 2-months with no real issues.

get a few great bottles of wine, you may need them before and after the bicycle trip (LOL). Driving is not an issue unless you have a standard. I was driving a standard after 2-months with no real issues.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Tina Taverna

72.218.73.203

Submitted on 2014/08/17 at 12:36 pm

I am going to order the Dragon software as I think that will help since I do a lot of typing being a travel agent. I also belong to a bicycle group and have a trip in Oct. that I think I will sip wine while they bike as I have not tried biking with my brace I now wear but don’t think it will work. Our next bike trip is in April to Santa Fe so hoping I will be able to bike by then and if not, they have great Margaritas 🙂 I am concerned about driving so going to call DMV and car dealership as I heard there is some sort of knob you can apply to the steering wheel to help you drive. I am rt handed and so I will be driving with my left – I will not be doing long distance driving while I have the cast but local trips will be necessary. Have you heard of such a thing to help driving possible? Tina
PS Great that you are back to your motorcycle as it certainly seems like that is your passion. My husband had a Harley once and I had a dirt bike – it was fun!!!!!

I am going to order the Dragon software as I think that will help since I do a lot of typing being a travel agent. I also belong to a bicycle group and have a trip in Oct. that I think I will sip wine while they bike as I have not tried biking with my brace I now wear but don’t think it will work. Our next bike trip is in April to Santa Fe so hoping I will be able to bike by then and if not, they have great Margaritas 🙂 I am concerned about driving so going to call DMV and car dealership as I heard there is some sort of knob you can apply to the steering wheel to help you drive. I am rt handed and so I will be driving with my left – I will not be doing long distance driving while I have the cast but local trips will be necessary. Have you heard of such a thing to help driving possible? Tina PS Great that you are back to your motorcycle as it certainly seems like that is your passion. My husband had a Harley once and I had a dirt bike – it was fun!!!!!

travelwithtina1@cox.net

Tina Taverna

Peter Sanderson
vespaadventures.ca

99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/08/17 at 12:00 pm

Hi,

Yes I had some pain after surgery and pills helped. I got off them quickly. I started Physical Therapy and continued on my own because where I live there was not experienced hand therapist. I have posted quite a bit about that. Research the page on exercise diagrams ( https://proximalrowcarpectomy.com/prc-explanation/exercise-diagrams/)

Hi, Yes I had some pain after surgery and pills helped. I got off them quickly. I started Physical Therapy and continued on my own because where I live there was not experienced hand therapist. I have posted quite a bit about that. Research the page on exercise diagrams ( https://proximalrowcarpectomy.com/prc-explanation/exercise-diagrams/)

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Tina Taverna
72.218.73.203

Submitted on 2014/08/17 at 11:40 am

Just checking if anybody is out there to answer my question on physical therapy after PRC?

Just checking if anybody is out there to answer my question on physical therapy after PRC?

travelwithtina1@cox.net

Tina Taverna

Tina Taverna

72.218.73.203

Submitted on 2014/08/10 at 8:35 am

Just finished watching your after 1 year video and it was very encouraging. I will mention the supplements you suggest to my family doctor as they seem to be over the counter supplements that should do no harm but may help in my case. I am a golfer and have not asked my surgeon yet but assume playing golf will be a challenge. My next appt with the doc is Oct. 31st so your blog has helped me put together some interesting questions. Thanks, Tina Taverna

Just finished watching your after 1 year video and it was very encouraging. I will mention the supplements you suggest to my family doctor as they seem to be over the counter supplements that should do no harm but may help in my case. I am a golfer and have not asked my surgeon yet but assume playing golf will be a challenge. My next appt with the doc is Oct. 31st so your blog has helped me put together some interesting questions. Thanks, Tina Taverna

travelwithtina1@cox.net

Tina Taverna

Tina Taverna

72.218.73.203

Submitted on 2014/08/09 at 3:06 pm

I am having my surgery done by a hand specialist and have a lot of questions to ask him prior to surgery. It will not change my mind in having it but would like to get an idea of what is ahead of me. This blog is very helpful. Just wondering if the incision was horizontal or vertical on most of these surgeries as I heard they are done both ways – depending on the surgeon. Did most of you go under general anesthesia and then have a valium prior to surgery? I assume it must be pretty painful after surgery so did you have to take heavy drugs to dull the pain and if so for how long? I was told the stitches would be removed one week after surgery and then cast applied. I am rt handed and it is the rt hand that will have the surgery – how did you do not being able to use that rt hand for 4 to 6 weeks with the cast and then for a while after that as you went through PT? Tina Taverna

I am having my surgery done by a hand specialist and have a lot of questions to ask him prior to surgery. It will not change my mind in having it but would like to get an idea of what is ahead of me. This blog is very helpful. Just wondering if the incision was horizontal or vertical on most of these surgeries as I heard they are done both ways – depending on the surgeon. Did most of you go under general anesthesia and then have a valium prior to surgery? I assume it must be pretty painful after surgery so did you have to take heavy drugs to dull the pain and if so for how long? I was told the stitches would be removed one week after surgery and then cast applied. I am rt handed and it is the rt hand that will have the surgery – how did you do not being able to use that rt hand for 4 to 6 weeks with the cast and then for a while after that as you went through PT? Tina Taverna

travelwithtina1@cox.net

Tina Taverna

Peter Sanderson
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/08/08 at 10:11 pm | In reply to Tina Taverna.

Did you watch my video after one year? I just did over 4000 Kilometers in 3-weeks on my brand new bike! I was also depressed and thought I would never ride again at 55 years old.

Did you watch my video after one year? I just did over 4000 Kilometers in 3-weeks on my brand new bike! I was also depressed and thought I would never ride again at 55 years old.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Peter Sanderson
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/08/08 at 10:05 pm | In reply to Tina Taverna.

Honestly, I purchased dragon and used it very briefly. I was able to type in a week or so.

Honestly, I purchased dragon and used it very briefly. I was able to type in a week or so.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Tina Taverna

72.218.73.203

Submitted on 2014/08/08 at 9:55 pm

I am a travel agent of 71 years old and do a lot of typing still even though I am retired. How long will it take before I can handle the keyboard again. Should I purchase the Dragon software to do my dictation as I know using my phone does not do the job. I am trying to prepare myself as my surgery will be in November and so I will be in a cast through the holidays and then PT starts. In reading all the notes on this blog, I am NOT looking forward to this surgery but do not want the fusion procedure and with the SLAC diagnosis, I cannot live like this anymore. I have 9 grandchildren under the age of 7 and can’t even pick them up anymore. Any advise you can give me will be very much appreciated. Tina

I am a travel agent of 71 years old and do a lot of typing still even though I am retired. How long will it take before I can handle the keyboard again. Should I purchase the Dragon software to do my dictation as I know using my phone does not do the job. I am trying to prepare myself as my surgery will be in November and so I will be in a cast through the holidays and then PT starts. In reading all the notes on this blog, I am NOT looking forward to this surgery but do not want the fusion procedure and with the SLAC diagnosis, I cannot live like this anymore. I have 9 grandchildren under the age of 7 and can’t even pick them up anymore. Any advise you can give me will be very much appreciated. Tina

travelwithtina1@cox.net

Tina Taverna

Mark

199.96.153.92

Submitted on 2014/07/30 at 9:55 am | In reply to Kurt.

I had my surgery in July of 2013. It was my left hand (I’m right handed). There is a scar but my watch covers most of it and somebody would have to be looking for the scar to see it. I didn’t have the swelling and finger stiffness that Peter had. I was tying my shoe laces a couple days after the surgery. I don’t have what I would consider pain in the wrist. If feels a little weird. It feels more weird in the meaty part of the palm where the thumb joins the hand. Not sure how to describe it. Maybe like a really, really mild sprain. It is not something that bothers me or keeps me from doing things. I don’t have good days or bad days. All the days are the same. My wrist is functional for what I need it to do. I have golfed. It does hurt in one specific spot when I golf (on the pinky side where the hand meets the wrist). It doesn’t really build up over the course of a round. It is just there. When I am done golfing, by the time I get home, as far as my wrist is concerned it is like I never went golfing. It feels normal (what’s normal to it anyway). No residual effects the next day. I admit I probalby won’t golf as much as I used to, but I don’t have to give up the sport.

Unfortunately, there seems to be a wide range of results from having this type of surgery. I feel that I lucked out in having it on my non-dominant hand. And in my case, I feel like I am in the top 90 percentile in getting a satisfactory result.

I had my surgery in July of 2013. It was my left hand (I’m right handed). There is a scar but my watch covers most of it and somebody would have to be looking for the scar to see it. I didn’t have the swelling and finger stiffness that Peter had. I was tying my shoe laces a couple days after the surgery. I don’t have what I would consider pain in the wrist. If feels a little weird. It feels more weird in the meaty part of the palm where the thumb joins the hand. Not sure how to describe it. Maybe like a really, really mild sprain. It is not something that bothers me or keeps me from doing things. I don’t have good days or bad days. All the days are the same. My wrist is functional for what I need it to do. I have golfed. It does hurt in one specific spot when I golf (on the pinky side where the hand meets the wrist). It doesn’t really build up over the course of a round. It is just there. When I am done golfing, by the time I get home, as far as my wrist is concerned it is like I never went golfing. It feels normal (what’s normal to it anyway). No residual effects the next day. I admit I probalby won’t golf as much as I used to, but I don’t have to give up the sport. Unfortunately, there seems to be a wide range of results from having this type of surgery. I feel that I lucked out in having it on my non-dominant hand. And in my case, I feel like I am in the top 90 percentile in getting a satisfactory result.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

Peter Sanderson
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/07/28 at 8:27 am | In reply to David Mayes.

David, I am so sorry to hear about the lack of success with your procedure. However your doctor did not provide you with the correct information. Believe it or not, the PRC procedure is in fact the quickest and least painful to recover from. The fusion requires many little wires and supports drilled into the little bones. The procedure is far longer and the pain and recover is far greater than a PRC.

I also can imagine wiping your but since I now do it with my left hand and not the right (PRC) hand. I could but it would be an effort an not as effective.

Unfortunately, the reasons for a PRC vary considerably and have direct affect to the recovery and long term success. If you already had much arthritis, the PRC may not have being the best solution?

If you wish to pursue a better solution, you may want to contact my surgeon Dr. Steve McCabe who now performs complete wrist replacements for people with extreme arthritis and pain.

As I had explained in my video, I had a lot of swelling and lack of movement due to inflammation which often feels like arthritis. You may want to have a look at Wobenzym Plus and start eating for inflammation. There are cookbooks out there and I have noticed a huge difference. In fact, when I cheat I feel it the next day in the form of stiff fingers.

I wish you luck and remember that full recovery after a PRC takes a year or longer.

David, I am so sorry to hear about the lack of success with your procedure. However your doctor did not provide you with the correct information. Believe it or not, the PRC procedure is in fact the quickest and least painful to recover from. The fusion requires many little wires and supports drilled into the little bones. The procedure is far longer and the pain and recover is far greater than a PRC. I also can imagine wiping your but since I now do it with my left hand and not the right (PRC) hand. I could but it would be an effort an not as effective. Unfortunately, the reasons for a PRC vary considerably and have direct affect to the recovery and long term success. If you already had much arthritis, the PRC may not have being the best solution? If you wish to pursue a better solution, you may want to contact my surgeon Dr. Steve McCabe who now performs complete wrist replacements for people with extreme arthritis and pain. As I had explained in my video, I had a lot of swelling and lack of movement due to inflammation which often feels like arthritis. You may want to have a look at Wobenzym Plus and start eating for inflammation. There are cookbooks out there and I have noticed a huge difference. In fact, when I cheat I feel it the next day in the form of stiff fingers. I wish you luck and remember that full recovery after a PRC takes a year or longer.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

David Mayes
108.73.125.142

Submitted on 2014/07/28 at 8:17 am

Debbie, I cant speak for everyone but I will tell you my experience after PRC. I had it on both wrists due to the extreme pain I was having from arthritis. I am a heavy equipment mechanic so the use of my hands are extremely important. I was told before the surgery the exact opposite you were told. The PRC takes longer for recovery. It involves the removal of a whole row of bones in the wrists. The bones in my wrists were dying and tendons coming off of them so I really didn’t have much choice. It has been over ten months since my surgery on my right wrist and four months on my left wrist. They are both extremely weak compared to before the surgery. I still have pain, stiffness and the mobility sucks. I bought an electric weed eater because I cant pull start a gas weed eater. I tried weed eating my back yard a couple of weeks ago and had to stop every 1-3 minutes to rest the hands and three fingers on the right hand went to sleep and still don’t want to come back after two weeks. They feel like they are shocking me. It is a sensitive subject but here goes. The worst thing since surgery is wiping my own butt after going to the bathroom. The hands don’t bend the way they use to so you can imagine. Social Security has accepted me for disability and the doctor has released me from his care even though he said the mobility in my left wrist is worse than the previous visit. Any time I pick something up with any weight it feels like my hands are going to come apart. They have already replaced me at my place of employment and I was told by the company nurse that she would never ok me coming back with the restriction I have on my hands. The long term disability insurance company knows I have been accepted for SSD but they want more proof I cant work any where or they will quit paying me. Now who do you think would hire a 62 year old mechanic that has had his back fused and PRC’s on both hands. I am going to another hand clinic in a few days for another opinion from another doctor. I will post what he tells me. I hope I haven’t discouraged anyone. My pain is much better in the wrists than before the surgery. Then it felt like I put my hands down and someone smacked them with a hammer.

Debbie, I cant speak for everyone but I will tell you my experience after PRC. I had it on both wrists due to the extreme pain I was having from arthritis. I am a heavy equipment mechanic so the use of my hands are extremely important. I was told before the surgery the exact opposite you were told. The PRC takes longer for recovery. It involves the removal of a whole row of bones in the wrists. The bones in my wrists were dying and tendons coming off of them so I really didn’t have much choice. It has been over ten months since my surgery on my right wrist and four months on my left wrist. They are both extremely weak compared to before the surgery. I still have pain, stiffness and the mobility sucks. I bought an electric weed eater because I cant pull start a gas weed eater. I tried weed eating my back yard a couple of weeks ago and had to stop every 1-3 minutes to rest the hands and three fingers on the right hand went to sleep and still don’t want to come back after two weeks. They feel like they are shocking me. It is a sensitive subject but here goes. The worst thing since surgery is wiping my own butt after going to the bathroom. The hands don’t bend the way they use to so you can imagine. Social Security has accepted me for disability and the doctor has released me from his care even though he said the mobility in my left wrist is worse than the previous visit. Any time I pick something up with any weight it feels like my hands are going to come apart. They have already replaced me at my place of employment and I was told by the company nurse that she would never ok me coming back with the restriction I have on my hands. The long term disability insurance company knows I have been accepted for SSD but they want more proof I cant work any where or they will quit paying me. Now who do you think would hire a 62 year old mechanic that has had his back fused and PRC’s on both hands. I am going to another hand clinic in a few days for another opinion from another doctor. I will post what he tells me. I hope I haven’t discouraged anyone. My pain is much better in the wrists than before the surgery. Then it felt like I put my hands down and someone smacked them with a hammer.

davidlmayes7901@att.net

David Mayes

Peter Sanderson
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/07/28 at 7:24 am | In reply to Debbie.

Well, here is the way I look at things. The arthritis is definitely something that will develop much quicker because of the lack of natural cartilage between the bones. However, my surgeon has already performed many wrist replacements and in 10 years from now, that procedure will most likely be perfected, the materials used will be better and it will be a solution fort severe arthritis. I also you can limit the onset of arthritis (slow it down) by diet and exercise.

The other thing to consider is that you can try the PRC route and if after a year it is not working you can then get the fusion. I know that I do not have a tremendous amount of wrist movement compared to others, but the movement I do have has enabled me to do the things I love such as riding a motorcycle.

Did you watch my last video of after one year?

Well, here is the way I look at things. The arthritis is definitely something that will develop much quicker because of the lack of natural cartilage between the bones. However, my surgeon has already performed many wrist replacements and in 10 years from now, that procedure will most likely be perfected, the materials used will be better and it will be a solution fort severe arthritis. I also you can limit the onset of arthritis (slow it down) by diet and exercise. The other thing to consider is that you can try the PRC route and if after a year it is not working you can then get the fusion. I know that I do not have a tremendous amount of wrist movement compared to others, but the movement I do have has enabled me to do the things I love such as riding a motorcycle. Did you watch my last video of after one year?

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Debbie

107.207.172.57

Submitted on 2014/07/28 at 12:15 am

Thank you for all of your thoughts and advice regarding wrist salvaging procedures. I am an active 53 yr. old female who is preparing for surgery THIS week. I was asked to decide whether I prefer the PRC or the 4 corner fusion. Although I am leaning toward the PRC, I am not sure that it’s the right decision for me. I have SLAC wrist and am in constant pain which radiates up to my shoulder. The limited movement in my wrist causes severely painful tendonitis in my elbow and this is my dominant hand. From what I am told, the PRC typically is a less involved surgery with a quicker recovery, but there is a chance of more arthritis in 10-20 years. Also, I don’t think this surgery will provide the best stability to my dominate wrist. The 4 corner fusion is a much more involved surgery with complications including possible non-union of the appliance to the bone, infection due to the screws and appliance being rejected by the body, and a longer recovery period. Also there could be problems with impingement from the foreign object in your body. Both surgeries will relieve the pain, but I was told neither one is better than the other in regards to the amount of mobility and strength after surgery. Does anyone know if your wrist is considerably weaker after a PRC and is there a possibility of strengthening it during therapy? I’m hoping your thoughts will help me in my decision. Also, I’m praying for guidance.

Thank you for all of your thoughts and advice regarding wrist salvaging procedures. I am an active 53 yr. old female who is preparing for surgery THIS week. I was asked to decide whether I prefer the PRC or the 4 corner fusion. Although I am leaning toward the PRC, I am not sure that it’s the right decision for me. I have SLAC wrist and am in constant pain which radiates up to my shoulder. The limited movement in my wrist causes severely painful tendonitis in my elbow and this is my dominant hand. From what I am told, the PRC typically is a less involved surgery with a quicker recovery, but there is a chance of more arthritis in 10-20 years. Also, I don’t think this surgery will provide the best stability to my dominate wrist. The 4 corner fusion is a much more involved surgery with complications including possible non-union of the appliance to the bone, infection due to the screws and appliance being rejected by the body, and a longer recovery period. Also there could be problems with impingement from the foreign object in your body. Both surgeries will relieve the pain, but I was told neither one is better than the other in regards to the amount of mobility and strength after surgery. Does anyone know if your wrist is considerably weaker after a PRC and is there a possibility of strengthening it during therapy? I’m hoping your thoughts will help me in my decision. Also, I’m praying for guidance.

debtkdbb@yahoo.com

Debbie

Kurt

107.5.106.233

Submitted on 2014/07/27 at 9:01 pm

I watched one of your recent videos and did not notice any noticeable scar. Is that the case? Also, is your range of motion better than pre surgery levels ? I have held off from surgery so far but increasing pain levels may push me to surgery. Any comments appreciated.

I watched one of your recent videos and did not notice any noticeable scar. Is that the case? Also, is your range of motion better than pre surgery levels ? I have held off from surgery so far but increasing pain levels may push me to surgery. Any comments appreciated.

skarjune@yahoo.com

Kurt

vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/07/27 at 4:49 pm

I ride my motorcycle and often I am on a bumpy road that jerks my wrist. No Pain. I had pain once or twice lifting too much and once using a jigsaw but it subsided quickly and went away overnight with no medication.

Don’t get me wrong however, If you were to knock my wrist with a stick or when I bang it on something it hurts for a bit. But in my case when that happens my fingers tend to swell a bit for a few days then it goes away. my new rule is to avoid knocking it whenever possible and life is good. That is why I say there are some 😦 days but mostly 🙂 days…

I ride my motorcycle and often I am on a bumpy road that jerks my wrist. No Pain. I had pain once or twice lifting too much and once using a jigsaw but it subsided quickly and went away overnight with no medication. Don’t get me wrong however, If you were to knock my wrist with a stick or when I bang it on something it hurts for a bit. But in my case when that happens my fingers tend to swell a bit for a few days then it goes away. my new rule is to avoid knocking it whenever possible and life is good. That is why I say there are some 😦 days but mostly 🙂 days…

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Kurt

107.5.106.233

Submitted on 2014/07/27 at 4:27 pm

What about pain ? Do you have any chronic pain or pain when you suddenly bump or jerk your wrist?

What about pain ? Do you have any chronic pain or pain when you suddenly bump or jerk your wrist?

skarjune@yahoo.com

Kurt

Paul

70.193.5.187

Submitted on 2014/07/24 at 8:40 pm | In reply to wixona13.

I’ve used the FUTURO Sport Wrist support for almost two years while avoiding the PRC. It’s a wrap that adjusts to your size. It helps keep the hand bones from hitting the arm bones, which is the source of the pain. It’s a 3M product and comes in skin & black. Mine are # 46378 and I bought them in the Internet.
Paul

I’ve used the FUTURO Sport Wrist support for almost two years while avoiding the PRC. It’s a wrap that adjusts to your size. It helps keep the hand bones from hitting the arm bones, which is the source of the pain. It’s a 3M product and comes in skin & black. Mine are # 46378 and I bought them in the Internet. Paul

PaulDobbin@aol.com

Paul

wixona13

24.118.225.69

Submitted on 2014/07/24 at 7:05 pm

Can anyone recommend a good wrist brace? Thank you in advance.

Can anyone recommend a good wrist brace? Thank you in advance.

wixona13@gmail.com

wixona13

wixona13

173.8.98.98

Submitted on 2014/07/23 at 3:09 pm | In reply to Peter Sanderson.

Thanks for the suggestions Mila and Peter!

Thanks for the suggestions Mila and Peter!

wixona13@gmail.com

wixona13

Peter Sanderson
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/07/22 at 6:31 am | In reply to Andrew.

My Surgeon (See Toronto Hand Clinic on top) works with a partner in the United States and together they did a complete wrist replacement. I would call their office and ask for his USA Partner. I believe they are in the Kentucky Hand Clinic.

My Surgeon (See Toronto Hand Clinic on top) works with a partner in the United States and together they did a complete wrist replacement. I would call their office and ask for his USA Partner. I believe they are in the Kentucky Hand Clinic.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Mila
proximalrowcarpectomy.com

50.47.99.151

Submitted on 2014/07/21 at 10:06 pm | In reply to Andrew.

I like Dr. Keramati, orthopedic surgeon Northwest, Seattle. He is done one complicated but successful surgery on my right hand. Now we will do the second one, remove three bones from the wrist. Herd good feedbacks about him from other people too. if there is a chance that they can use bone grafting- I am sure he would let you know all detailed.

I like Dr. Keramati, orthopedic surgeon Northwest, Seattle. He is done one complicated but successful surgery on my right hand. Now we will do the second one, remove three bones from the wrist. Herd good feedbacks about him from other people too. if there is a chance that they can use bone grafting- I am sure he would let you know all detailed.

chiromila@hotmail.com

Mila

http://proximalrowcarpectomy.com

wixona13

173.8.98.98

Submitted on 2014/07/21 at 5:52 pm

I’m in the U.S.

I’m in the U.S.

wixona13@gmail.com

wixona13

Peter Sanderson
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/07/21 at 5:15 pm | In reply to wixona13.

What Country?

What Country?

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

wixona13

173.8.98.98

Submitted on 2014/07/21 at 5:13 pm

I too have a tough situation with my wrists. I ruptured the scapholunate ligament many years ago now, but it was misdiagnosed. Now I have arthritis in both, and as a result surgeons are telling me I only have the option of a PRC or 4CF. However, I’ve read about a Dr. Tang doing cartilage grafting in the wrist http://nyp.org/news/hospital/surgical-wrist-arthritis.html and also about a study in which rib cartilage was transplanted in the wrist with long-term success in a number of patients http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24436822. Does anyone here know more about these procedures?
Does anyone here know of a good way to find the wrist surgeons in the country? I’ve obviously tried google searching, and I’ve some lists, but with uncertain methodology. If I do have to get one of these fairly complicated and tricky procedures done, I want to try to find the best and most experienced surgeon out there.

I too have a tough situation with my wrists. I ruptured the scapholunate ligament many years ago now, but it was misdiagnosed. Now I have arthritis in both, and as a result surgeons are telling me I only have the option of a PRC or 4CF. However, I’ve read about a Dr. Tang doing cartilage grafting in the wrist http://nyp.org/news/hospital/surgical-wrist-arthritis.html and also about a study in which rib cartilage was transplanted in the wrist with long-term success in a number of patients http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24436822. Does anyone here know more about these procedures? Does anyone here know of a good way to find the wrist surgeons in the country? I’ve obviously tried google searching, and I’ve some lists, but with uncertain methodology. If I do have to get one of these fairly complicated and tricky procedures done, I want to try to find the best and most experienced surgeon out there.

wixona13@gmail.com

wixona13

Andrew
gravatar.com/wixona13

173.8.98.98

Submitted on 2014/07/21 at 5:10 pm

I too have a tough situation with my wrists. I ruptured the scapholunate ligament many years ago now, but it was misdiagnosed. Now I have arthritis in both, and as a result surgeons are telling me I only have the option of a PRC or 4CF. However, I’ve read about a Dr. Tang doing cartilage grafting in the wrist http://nyp.org/news/hospital/surgical-wrist-arthritis.html and also about a study in which rib cartilage was transplanted in the wrist with long-term success in a number of patients http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24436822. Does anyone here know more about these procedures?

Does anyone here know of a good way to find the wrist surgeons in the country? I’ve obviously tried googling, and I found some lists, but with uncertain methodology. If I do have to get one of these fairly complicated and tricky procedures done, that I’ll have to live with day-in-day-out the rest of my life, I want to try to find the best and most experienced surgeon out there. thanks

I too have a tough situation with my wrists. I ruptured the scapholunate ligament many years ago now, but it was misdiagnosed. Now I have arthritis in both, and as a result surgeons are telling me I only have the option of a PRC or 4CF. However, I’ve read about a Dr. Tang doing cartilage grafting in the wrist http://nyp.org/news/hospital/surgical-wrist-arthritis.html and also about a study in which rib cartilage was transplanted in the wrist with long-term success in a number of patients http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24436822. Does anyone here know more about these procedures? Does anyone here know of a good way to find the wrist surgeons in the country? I’ve obviously tried googling, and I found some lists, but with uncertain methodology. If I do have to get one of these fairly complicated and tricky procedures done, that I’ll have to live with day-in-day-out the rest of my life, I want to try to find the best and most experienced surgeon out there. thanks

wixona13@gmail.com

Andrew

http://gravatar.com/wixona13

Kathy Tirado

76.17.168.76

Submitted on 2014/07/19 at 10:22 pm

I was going to have my prc surgery this month. Last July I had a cardiac stent implanted and needed to take Effient for one year. Surgeon wouldn’t operate until I was done with the drug. Well at the end of June, I needed 4 more cardiac stents so I’m back on the Effient for another year. The cardiologist won’t approve my going off of it. So I’m planning to meet with ortho guy and ask for the best non surgical solution. I hope this makes sense to the readers. Any thoughts?

I was going to have my prc surgery this month. Last July I had a cardiac stent implanted and needed to take Effient for one year. Surgeon wouldn’t operate until I was done with the drug. Well at the end of June, I needed 4 more cardiac stents so I’m back on the Effient for another year. The cardiologist won’t approve my going off of it. So I’m planning to meet with ortho guy and ask for the best non surgical solution. I hope this makes sense to the readers. Any thoughts?

kathyt1122@Gmail.com

Kathy Tirado

Jennifer

70.208.2.181

Submitted on 2014/07/19 at 5:31 pm | In reply to Jan.

I have had 10 surgeries between my two hands over the years trying to find relief to all my pain. I am bone on bone in both wrists and have severe arthritis. I have had partial fusions on both wrists 15 years ago. But I’m now back to the point I have to do something again and it’s going to be major what ever it may be. My options are PRC or full fusions. Being only 42 I am wanting to postpone losing my motion as long as possible. My doctor suggested cutting my nerves a while back to help ease the pain. It wasn’t a fix to my problem but would help living with it. I did the surgery a year and a half ago and it did make a difference. I think if you are doing a procedure that stops the progression of your arthritis and hopefully removing some of the issues having the nerve cut is worth it. If it’s the same as mine, you don’t notice it except the decrease in pain. The nerves that are cut have nothing to do with the outside of your hand. The doctor could cut it and not tell you and you would never know it except for hopefully you’re not in as much pain.
Good luck!

I have had 10 surgeries between my two hands over the years trying to find relief to all my pain. I am bone on bone in both wrists and have severe arthritis. I have had partial fusions on both wrists 15 years ago. But I’m now back to the point I have to do something again and it’s going to be major what ever it may be. My options are PRC or full fusions. Being only 42 I am wanting to postpone losing my motion as long as possible. My doctor suggested cutting my nerves a while back to help ease the pain. It wasn’t a fix to my problem but would help living with it. I did the surgery a year and a half ago and it did make a difference. I think if you are doing a procedure that stops the progression of your arthritis and hopefully removing some of the issues having the nerve cut is worth it. If it’s the same as mine, you don’t notice it except the decrease in pain. The nerves that are cut have nothing to do with the outside of your hand. The doctor could cut it and not tell you and you would never know it except for hopefully you’re not in as much pain. Good luck!

makualupo@msn.com

Jennifer

walaba1957
walaba1957.wordpress.com

166.205.68.16

Submitted on 2014/07/19 at 3:26 pm | In reply to Jan.

A PRC is generally a step before total fusion. When I had my PRC done my doctor told me that I would eventually need a fusion. I also had the denervation done to help with the pain. Which it did. I’m a nurse & my doctor hoped the PRC lasted until after I retired. Good days & bad days. Good luck with your situation.

A PRC is generally a step before total fusion. When I had my PRC done my doctor told me that I would eventually need a fusion. I also had the denervation done to help with the pain. Which it did. I’m a nurse & my doctor hoped the PRC lasted until after I retired. Good days & bad days. Good luck with your situation.

ladeckernurse@yahoo.com

walaba1957

http://walaba1957.wordpress.com

eparccrawlers.com
eparccrawlers.com/forums/member.php?u=379845-SVMXL
192.208.187.234

Submitted on 2014/07/19 at 11:28 am

What’s up to every , because I am really keen of reading this web site’s post to be
updated regularly. It carries good information.

What’s up to every , because I am really keen of reading this web site’s post to be updated regularly. It carries good information.

annadeyoung@googlemail.com

eparccrawlers.com

http://www.eparccrawlers.com/forums/member.php?u=379845-SVMXL

Jan

23.126.43.105

Submitted on 2014/07/18 at 8:47 pm | In reply to Paul.

She will also be removing the same 3 bones as described in the feed as well as cut the nerve. So I guess waiting isn’t a good either. She said that fusion is an alternative, but she usually only does that type of procedure on construction workers because they need to lift a lot of weight. I still want to have the mobility/dexterity of my wrist.

She will also be removing the same 3 bones as described in the feed as well as cut the nerve. So I guess waiting isn’t a good either. She said that fusion is an alternative, but she usually only does that type of procedure on construction workers because they need to lift a lot of weight. I still want to have the mobility/dexterity of my wrist.

jerikson55@yahoo.com

Jan

Paul

70.199.230.20

Submitted on 2014/07/18 at 5:55 pm

I have now postponed the PRC long enough that the hand surgeon wants to do a 4 corner fusion. Says the lunate is too badly damaged. Never heard or read anything about cutting and nerves, that must be some other proceedure than a PRC.
The doctor says the fusion will eliminate the pain along woth the cart bad cartliiage. He also say the wrist will be stronger than the PRC wrist. Any thoughts on this approach?

I have now postponed the PRC long enough that the hand surgeon wants to do a 4 corner fusion. Says the lunate is too badly damaged. Never heard or read anything about cutting and nerves, that must be some other proceedure than a PRC. The doctor says the fusion will eliminate the pain along woth the cart bad cartliiage. He also say the wrist will be stronger than the PRC wrist. Any thoughts on this approach?

PaulDobbin@aol.com

Paul

Jan

23.126.43.105

Submitted on 2014/07/18 at 2:42 pm | In reply to Peter Sanderson.

Thank you for your quick response. I’ve been searching for any info I can get on this type of surgery & I don’t see anywhere else where they cut the nerve. I’m hoping to get a second opinion, because cutting the nerve really isn’t sitting well with me.

Thank you for your quick response. I’ve been searching for any info I can get on this type of surgery & I don’t see anywhere else where they cut the nerve. I’m hoping to get a second opinion, because cutting the nerve really isn’t sitting well with me.

jerikson55@yahoo.com

Jan

Peter Sanderson
vespaadventures.ca

99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/07/18 at 9:55 am | In reply to Jan.

No nerve cutting on my procedure.

No nerve cutting on my procedure.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Jan

23.126.43.105

Submitted on 2014/07/17 at 4:27 pm

The first week of Aug. I’m due to have what I think to be this same surgery you had. I’m really having 2nd thoughts about having it done. My hand surgeon will also be cutting the nerve to stop the future pain & I’m very concerned about that. Did they do that when you had your surgery?

The first week of Aug. I’m due to have what I think to be this same surgery you had. I’m really having 2nd thoughts about having it done. My hand surgeon will also be cutting the nerve to stop the future pain & I’m very concerned about that. Did they do that when you had your surgery?

jerikson55@yahoo.com

Jan

Jon A Plucker

68.1.38.8

Submitted on 2014/06/27 at 1:18 am

I am 60 years old and initially had a Tri-Scaphoid fusion because of a torn ligament in my hand. I had my first tri-scaphoid fusion in July 1983 and because not enough donor bone was inserted I had a second fusion in Feb 1984. I had full use of my had until about mid 2005 when my range of motion and strength was reduced and my pain level increased. I had my PRC in Mar 2006 and was initially quite happy with the results. However, I am currently suffering more pain and my range of motion have decreased to the point where I am again seeking medical care.

I am 60 years old and initially had a Tri-Scaphoid fusion because of a torn ligament in my hand. I had my first tri-scaphoid fusion in July 1983 and because not enough donor bone was inserted I had a second fusion in Feb 1984. I had full use of my had until about mid 2005 when my range of motion and strength was reduced and my pain level increased. I had my PRC in Mar 2006 and was initially quite happy with the results. However, I am currently suffering more pain and my range of motion have decreased to the point where I am again seeking medical care.

japlucker@cox.net

Jon A Plucker

Jonathan Hoffmann

69.122.129.164

Submitted on 2014/06/07 at 2:07 pm | In reply to Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner.

Fantastic. This was well worth it then. Thank you

Fantastic. This was well worth it then. Thank you

jonsteel1313@gmail.com

Jonathan Hoffmann

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/06/05 at 7:54 am | In reply to Jonathan Hoffmann.

It could take up to a full year before completely plateaued

It could take up to a full year before completely plateaued

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Jonathan Hoffmann

69.122.129.164

Submitted on 2014/06/04 at 10:31 pm

Hello. I broke my schaphoid approximately 3 years ago. I am 36 and have been a roofer for 20 years. Had a cast put on and was told not to work. But as I am the owner of my own business I could not afford the luxury of simply not working. So my schaphoid did not mend. Over Time I realized that I must get it treated. So I went to an orthopedic and
found that my condition was worse then I expected. Bone was pulverized so it could not be pinned and grafted. Had proximal row carpectomy approximately 11 weeks ago. Da
y one after surgery was rough.got home from hospital and as the anesthesia wore off I was in extreme pain. Docter gave me 5 mg Percocet. Was told to take no more then 2 every 5 bours and they gave me exactly enough to last me until my next appointment with the doc 3 days later. The pain was almost unbearable. And I am a man who is used to living with pain.I did as I was told for from three in afternoon until 8:00 am the following day. When I called the doctor
and practically yelled at them. They gave me 40 more pills. Why did they not tell me I could take more if I had too? I suffered all night. Anyway I went back to light duty 3 weeks later. I would be lying if I said it wasn’t extremely painful. and I was surprised at how much my forearm bicep and pectoral had atrophied in only three weeks. By week six I was feeling significantly stronger. Now at week 11 I am able to do everything. But still having pain of course. But it is improving everyday. my flexibility though is another matter altogether. I have almost none. Can anyone tell me how long until it is fully healed?. Meaning it is as good as it is ever going to be?

Hello. I broke my schaphoid approximately 3 years ago. I am 36 and have been a roofer for 20 years. Had a cast put on and was told not to work. But as I am the owner of my own business I could not afford the luxury of simply not working. So my schaphoid did not mend. Over Time I realized that I must get it treated. So I went to an orthopedic and found that my condition was worse then I expected. Bone was pulverized so it could not be pinned and grafted. Had proximal row carpectomy approximately 11 weeks ago. Da y one after surgery was rough.got home from hospital and as the anesthesia wore off I was in extreme pain. Docter gave me 5 mg Percocet. Was told to take no more then 2 every 5 bours and they gave me exactly enough to last me until my next appointment with the doc 3 days later. The pain was almost unbearable. And I am a man who is used to living with pain.I did as I was told for from three in afternoon until 8:00 am the following day. When I called the doctor and practically yelled at them. They gave me 40 more pills. Why did they not tell me I could take more if I had too? I suffered all night. Anyway I went back to light duty 3 weeks later. I would be lying if I said it wasn’t extremely painful. and I was surprised at how much my forearm bicep and pectoral had atrophied in only three weeks. By week six I was feeling significantly stronger. Now at week 11 I am able to do everything. But still having pain of course. But it is improving everyday. my flexibility though is another matter altogether. I have almost none. Can anyone tell me how long until it is fully healed?. Meaning it is as good as it is ever going to be?

jonsteel1313@gmail.com

Jonathan Hoffmann

LeAnn

166.205.68.23

Submitted on 2014/05/29 at 8:10 am

I developed Keinboch’s disease in my right dominant wrist in 2009 & had a PRC done in 2011. Being a nurse it left me unable to do CPR anymore so I had to find a desk job. I was fortunate to find a desk job but, all the typing, writing, carrying, pushing, pulling on a constant basis throughout the day leaves me in severe pain by the end of the day. All the veins will stick out my hand & wrist & won’t go down until I get home & soak my hand/wrist. Thinking I may need to go back to my hand/wrist specialist.

I developed Keinboch’s disease in my right dominant wrist in 2009 & had a PRC done in 2011. Being a nurse it left me unable to do CPR anymore so I had to find a desk job. I was fortunate to find a desk job but, all the typing, writing, carrying, pushing, pulling on a constant basis throughout the day leaves me in severe pain by the end of the day. All the veins will stick out my hand & wrist & won’t go down until I get home & soak my hand/wrist. Thinking I may need to go back to my hand/wrist specialist.

ladeckernurse@yahoo.com

LeAnn

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/05/26 at 11:53 am | In reply to Kathy Tirado.

I was able to more than I thought. My worst part was removing the brace after the cast was removed to wash my hand daily. That lasted for a week or so. No button shirts and loose fitting jogging pants are best (zipper and button on jeans).

I was able to more than I thought. My worst part was removing the brace after the cast was removed to wash my hand daily. That lasted for a week or so. No button shirts and loose fitting jogging pants are best (zipper and button on jeans).

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Kathy Tirado

66.41.95.140

Submitted on 2014/05/26 at 11:50 am | In reply to Christina S.

Thanks for your response. I have spoken to my cardiologist, primary care doc, and liver doc. I have to change some meds over time so it looks like July will be the surgery. I’m worried as I live alone and am unsure about dressing myself and things like that. How much are you able to do? I’m moving apartments on July 1st so I’ll have to quick unpack!

Thanks for your response. I have spoken to my cardiologist, primary care doc, and liver doc. I have to change some meds over time so it looks like July will be the surgery. I’m worried as I live alone and am unsure about dressing myself and things like that. How much are you able to do? I’m moving apartments on July 1st so I’ll have to quick unpack!

kathyt1122@Gmail.com

Kathy Tirado

Christina S
70.181.40.177

Submitted on 2014/05/21 at 9:35 pm | In reply to Kathy Tirado.

Kathy,
I’m a 65 yr old and I nursed my wrist along for years and all I did was make it worse. The brace helped but daily life got in the way making my wrist sore ALL the time, instead of most of the time. I had my surg May 28th and am still in cast. However, I had a reaction to the anestesea (spelled wrong) and landed in the cardiac unit with congestive heart failure for 7 days.
.
Cast comes off next week. I have to say that the pain and discomfort was doable for me and I did hit the pain pills when necessary. I have pain free movement of 4 fingers, the only thing that hurts is the base of the thumb, which has me worried.

Please ask a lot of questions about the anestersea and possible drug interactions with the meds you are taking.
Good luck to you

Kathy, I’m a 65 yr old and I nursed my wrist along for years and all I did was make it worse. The brace helped but daily life got in the way making my wrist sore ALL the time, instead of most of the time. I had my surg May 28th and am still in cast. However, I had a reaction to the anestesea (spelled wrong) and landed in the cardiac unit with congestive heart failure for 7 days. . Cast comes off next week. I have to say that the pain and discomfort was doable for me and I did hit the pain pills when necessary. I have pain free movement of 4 fingers, the only thing that hurts is the base of the thumb, which has me worried. Please ask a lot of questions about the anestersea and possible drug interactions with the meds you are taking. Good luck to you

wstport@cox.net

Christina S

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
99.241.148.154

Submitted on 2014/05/21 at 5:46 pm | In reply to Kathy Tirado.

Find the best hand surgeon around and have it done. I will be posting an article on some natural products that I have discovered helped tremendously. I am in the middle of moving and have lifted heavy boxes etc… Yes, my fingers get a bit swollen but no pain. I just got my computer and office together so I hope to publish a blog article shortly.

Find the best hand surgeon around and have it done. I will be posting an article on some natural products that I have discovered helped tremendously. I am in the middle of moving and have lifted heavy boxes etc… Yes, my fingers get a bit swollen but no pain. I just got my computer and office together so I hope to publish a blog article shortly.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Kathy Tirado

66.41.95.140

Submitted on 2014/05/21 at 5:22 pm | In reply to lori mobley.

Im supposed to have a prc done in July. Im 66 years old and am thinking maybe I’ll just skip the surgery and just use the splint. However I don’t want anything to get worse. I broke my scaffoid bone which is necrotic so they recommend this procedure. Any opinions?

lori mobley

Submitted on 2014/05/21 at 12:04 pm

my husband had surgery about 10 months ago he had broke wrist 12 years ago and had graft and screw the screw started backing out and froze his wrist in pain unfortunatly his pain and use of wrist is worse than before he is in construction and uses his hands for everything and now can not work more than 3 hrs or so before wrist is useless he can only hold a glasss for about 20 seconds we are told pain is from bone on bone by two doctors and choice is live with it or fuse it. we do not want to fuse going to go for a 3rd opinion not a sucessfull surgery in our eyes very stressed about working husband is only 52

my husband had surgery about 10 months ago he had broke wrist 12 years ago and had graft and screw the screw started backing out and froze his wrist in pain unfortunatly his pain and use of wrist is worse than before he is in construction and uses his hands for everything and now can not work more than 3 hrs or so before wrist is useless he can only hold a glasss for about 20 seconds we are told pain is from bone on bone by two doctors and choice is live with it or fuse it. we do not want to fuse going to go for a 3rd opinion not a sucessfull surgery in our eyes very stressed about working husband is only 52

ourkids1@hotmail.com

lori mobley

 

Patricia

Submitted on 2014/05/04 at 11:58 am

I fail in Sept and fructure my Scalpniod bone in my right wrist. I had abone graft done in February, but the graft did not take, and the pain is increasing each day. I am having a P.R.C. on Monday morning. What I will have left in my wrist once surgery is completed, is the removal of the scalpnoid and the two joining bones removed and the 4 left will be screwed together to support the wrist function. I have been told that I will still have movement in the wrist. Has anyone out there experienced this and what was your outcome.

I fail in Sept and fructure my Scalpniod bone in my right wrist. I had abone graft done in February, but the graft did not take, and the pain is increasing each day. I am having a P.R.C. on Monday morning. What I will have left in my wrist once surgery is completed, is the removal of the scalpnoid and the two joining bones removed and the 4 left will be screwed together to support the wrist function. I have been told that I will still have movement in the wrist. Has anyone out there experienced this and what was your outcome.

pat.humburg@gmail.com

Patricia

Selina Hussain

Submitted on 2014/05/04 at 8:31 am

I overextended my dominant hand causing a scapholunate dislocation. This was missed on the initial x ray and after a few months someone finally noticed. My first surgery was a bone graft to replace the torn ligament between my scaphoid and lunate from my middle finger joint which was screwed into place. A few months into physio the pain increased and x rays showed one of the screws was loosening so it was decided I would have a second surgery to remove both screws. After not taking any post op x rays I noticed a lot of pain and still restricted movement that was assumed to be the fault of the screws. After physio and acupuncture my surgeon realised that we did not have post op x rays and when they were taken it shows the removal of the screws had dislodged the bone graft causing it be reabsorbed. So I am back to my dislocated wrist. Now I’m told I need surgery again and having seen another surgeon, between the two of them my options are: If the surfaces aren’t too damaged a PRC (which to me at the time seemed drastic), otherwise a wrist fusion with some nerve cutting, or possibly a wrist joint replacement. My question to any of you post op is has anyone had this for quite a while now? or been told just how long this surgery will last them? Because my doctor said it would only last so long then I would have to try one of the alternatives anyway. I am 24 and all that happened was an accident that barely hurt at the time. How long were you in cast? And what % movement did you gain back? What’s the pain like? And I guess the big question, now you’ve had it, if you could go back and make that decision again would you still pick it? Was it worth it?

I overextended my dominant hand causing a scapholunate dislocation. This was missed on the initial x ray and after a few months someone finally noticed. My first surgery was a bone graft to replace the torn ligament between my scaphoid and lunate from my middle finger joint which was screwed into place. A few months into physio the pain increased and x rays showed one of the screws was loosening so it was decided I would have a second surgery to remove both screws. After not taking any post op x rays I noticed a lot of pain and still restricted movement that was assumed to be the fault of the screws. After physio and acupuncture my surgeon realised that we did not have post op x rays and when they were taken it shows the removal of the screws had dislodged the bone graft causing it be reabsorbed. So I am back to my dislocated wrist. Now I’m told I need surgery again and having seen another surgeon, between the two of them my options are: If the surfaces aren’t too damaged a PRC (which to me at the time seemed drastic), otherwise a wrist fusion with some nerve cutting, or possibly a wrist joint replacement. My question to any of you post op is has anyone had this for quite a while now? or been told just how long this surgery will last them? Because my doctor said it would only last so long then I would have to try one of the alternatives anyway. I am 24 and all that happened was an accident that barely hurt at the time. How long were you in cast? And what % movement did you gain back? What’s the pain like? And I guess the big question, now you’ve had it, if you could go back and make that decision again would you still pick it? Was it worth it?

selina.hussain@rocketmail.com

Selina Hussain

Christina S
Submitted on 2014/04/20 at 5:20 pm | In reply to Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner.

No, they can’t stop this auto immune response, they can only treat the symptoms. However, I am told that it can go into remission and it5 will never show it’s ugly face again. They have some new “biologics” but they are real chancy and cause all kinds of other problems, like heart attack and stroke. I already have new hip and new knee and now this. I’ll be the bionic women by the all this done. No more making jewelry, Surgery is scheduled for 4/28. hx for the support.

No, they can’t stop this auto immune response, they can only treat the symptoms. However, I am told that it can go into remission and it5 will never show it’s ugly face again. They have some new "biologics" but they are real chancy and cause all kinds of other problems, like heart attack and stroke. I already have new hip and new knee and now this. I’ll be the bionic women by the all this done. No more making jewelry, Surgery is scheduled for 4/28. hx for the support.

wstport@cox.net

Christina S

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2014/04/15 at 3:16 pm | In reply to Christina S.

Wow, that is an unusual reason to have this surgery. I wish you luck and keep us informed. Can they stop the immune system from further attacks to cartilage?

Wow, that is an unusual reason to have this surgery. I wish you luck and keep us informed. Can they stop the immune system from further attacks to cartilage?

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Christina S

Submitted on 2014/04/15 at 3:02 pm

I am grateful to find your blog, as I was diagnosed today. I have systemic schlerderma ( an autoimmune disorder). My immune system thinks it needs to make new skin cells (that I don’t need) so it has attacked my left wrist and dissolved the cartilage to get enough collegan to make these skin cells. So all my small bones are floating around in my wrist with no cartilage to hold them into place and the pain is over the top, when one of puppies hits or pinches a nerve. This surgery is my only option. I’m hopeful my bounce back from this surgery is as easy as some you. I’m quite nervous, so thx for listening.

I am grateful to find your blog, as I was diagnosed today. I have systemic schlerderma ( an autoimmune disorder). My immune system thinks it needs to make new skin cells (that I don’t need) so it has attacked my left wrist and dissolved the cartilage to get enough collegan to make these skin cells. So all my small bones are floating around in my wrist with no cartilage to hold them into place and the pain is over the top, when one of puppies hits or pinches a nerve. This surgery is my only option. I’m hopeful my bounce back from this surgery is as easy as some you. I’m quite nervous, so thx for listening.

wstport@cox.net

Christina S

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2014/04/07 at 2:17 pm | In reply to Barb L.

I would search online for the hand clinic in Kentucky and then contact them They should be able to recommend a hand surgeon.

I would search online for the hand clinic in Kentucky and then contact them They should be able to recommend a hand surgeon.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Barb L

Submitted on 2014/04/07 at 1:18 pm | In reply to Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner.

Thank you, I saw the utube video you have on here and it looks and sounds like I would love to try this instead of fusion, but I live in Nebraska. How do I find a surgeon that does this procedure?

Thank you, I saw the utube video you have on here and it looks and sounds like I would love to try this instead of fusion, but I live in Nebraska. How do I find a surgeon that does this procedure?

barblong50@yahoo.com

Barb L

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
67.193.27.236

Submitted on 2014/04/07 at 1:01 pm | In reply to Barb L.

Well, that is exactly what I had and a PRC worked. My lunate became brittle and cracked due to a lack of blood flow. I am not a doctor and can not make a diagnosis on your situation, but I would seek out the opinion of a hand surgeon.

Well, that is exactly what I had and a PRC worked. My lunate became brittle and cracked due to a lack of blood flow. I am not a doctor and can not make a diagnosis on your situation, but I would seek out the opinion of a hand surgeon.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Barb L

Submitted on 2014/04/07 at 12:39 pm

My lunate was just diagnosed and it is stage IV, completely dead. Would this PRC work on my, right now they are saying I have no option except surgery to remove the dead bone and then fuse the entire wrist so I would have no movement in it at all.

My lunate was just diagnosed and it is stage IV, completely dead. Would this PRC work on my, right now they are saying I have no option except surgery to remove the dead bone and then fuse the entire wrist so I would have no movement in it at all.

barblong50@yahoo.com

Barb L

Maria

Submitted on 2014/04/05 at 1:23 am | In reply to Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner.

Thanks for your answer!

It makes me really sad that there is no better answer to these problems, and that you loose so much movement in your hand. Are you worried about not be able to ride your motorcycle again, your wrist is not fully healed yet? I hope you will succeed in that! 🙂

I am having my surgery in maybe 6 months or so (in Finland you have to queue up to 6 months to get your surgery) so I still have time to consider whether to really do this surgery now, or just wait a few years until my wrist gets unbearable and do this surgery later. I don’t like the idea of loosing so much movement..

Thanks for your answer! It makes me really sad that there is no better answer to these problems, and that you loose so much movement in your hand. Are you worried about not be able to ride your motorcycle again, your wrist is not fully healed yet? I hope you will succeed in that! 🙂 I am having my surgery in maybe 6 months or so (in Finland you have to queue up to 6 months to get your surgery) so I still have time to consider whether to really do this surgery now, or just wait a few years until my wrist gets unbearable and do this surgery later. I don’t like the idea of loosing so much movement..

maria.holmstrom@outlook.com

Maria

lori

Submitted on 2014/04/04 at 5:07 pm

My husband had this surgery 9 months ago due to the screw in his wrist bone backing out. He is still in a great amount of pain and we are going back to the doctor later this month. He did have physical therapy after and did all the heat and cold treatments. He is a cabinet maker by trade and we have had to close our business after 25 years. He says he has some strength back but very painful to write, brush teeth and push lumber thru his saw. Anyone have any information on their pain level and how long it took to disapate

My husband had this surgery 9 months ago due to the screw in his wrist bone backing out. He is still in a great amount of pain and we are going back to the doctor later this month. He did have physical therapy after and did all the heat and cold treatments. He is a cabinet maker by trade and we have had to close our business after 25 years. He says he has some strength back but very painful to write, brush teeth and push lumber thru his saw. Anyone have any information on their pain level and how long it took to disapate

ourkids1@hotmail.com

lori

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2014/04/02 at 10:28 am | In reply to Maria.

Hi, You can get up to 50 % bend of the original. I was not so lucky but I find that I am not that much limited since the body attacks chores from a different angle, your arm and shoulder often compensates. However, you will not be able to do push ups because your hand will not bend that way. You may be able to do them with a closed fist and wrist straight. Depends how heavy you are, I guess and how well your wrist heals. Not something I can do. My goal was to ride a motorcycle again and I am hoping to reach that this summer (as soon as the snow goes).

I wish you luck with your procedure and please keep us informed about how it goes and send us some updates 🙂

Hi, You can get up to 50 % bend of the original. I was not so lucky but I find that I am not that much limited since the body attacks chores from a different angle, your arm and shoulder often compensates. However, you will not be able to do push ups because your hand will not bend that way. You may be able to do them with a closed fist and wrist straight. Depends how heavy you are, I guess and how well your wrist heals. Not something I can do. My goal was to ride a motorcycle again and I am hoping to reach that this summer (as soon as the snow goes). I wish you luck with your procedure and please keep us informed about how it goes and send us some updates 🙂

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Maria

Submitted on 2014/04/02 at 9:49 am

I am so glad that i found your blog! I found out that I have Kienböcks disease when I was 21 (I’m now 23). I’ve already had 2 surgeries, but none of them worked. So know my doctor suggested the PRC.
Can I ask you about the movement in your hand after the surgery, did you get it back (or at least the 50% back)? I was told that you might not even get that much movement back..
And can you put some weight on it, can you for example do a push up?

Thanks!

I am so glad that i found your blog! I found out that I have Kienböcks disease when I was 21 (I’m now 23). I’ve already had 2 surgeries, but none of them worked. So know my doctor suggested the PRC. Can I ask you about the movement in your hand after the surgery, did you get it back (or at least the 50% back)? I was told that you might not even get that much movement back.. And can you put some weight on it, can you for example do a push up? Thanks!

maria.holmstrom@outlook.com

Maria

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2014/03/14 at 7:40 am | In reply to Chet.

If you read the blog there are some golfers who were golfing months after their operation. There are also others that could not. It seems to be that kind of procedure and you never know how your hand reacts to such a surgery until you actually do it.

If you read the blog there are some golfers who were golfing months after their operation. There are also others that could not. It seems to be that kind of procedure and you never know how your hand reacts to such a surgery until you actually do it.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Chet
nepachet@ptd.net
24.115.100.111

Submitted on 2014/03/13 at 5:21 pm

I use to golf a lot then only a few times a year after developed Kienbock in my left wrist from a fall, Haven’t golfed in about 5 years because the pain after a round wasn’t worth it. The golfing was with a neoprene wrist brace and after a few swings pain would develop. It’s my left wrist the power wrist in my swing. As I near retirement I would really like to start golfing again and was wondering if after the PRC surgery would I be able to golf once or twice a week pain free. Thanks

I use to golf a lot then only a few times a year after developed Kienbock in my left wrist from a fall, Haven’t golfed in about 5 years because the pain after a round wasn’t worth it. The golfing was with a neoprene wrist brace and after a few swings pain would develop. It’s my left wrist the power wrist in my swing. As I near retirement I would really like to start golfing again and was wondering if after the PRC surgery would I be able to golf once or twice a week pain free. Thanks

nepachet@ptd.net

Chet

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
67.193.27.236

Submitted on 2014/03/12 at 2:39 pm | In reply to Kathy Tirado.

It does look a bit different but only to me. Unless I point out the different wrist to someone they would not notice. I would take a picture of my both hands together but I cannot operate the camera with my mouth. Perhaps later when a friend comes over.

It does look a bit different but only to me. Unless I point out the different wrist to someone they would not notice. I would take a picture of my both hands together but I cannot operate the camera with my mouth. Perhaps later when a friend comes over.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Kathy Tirado
https://www.facebook.com/kathy.tirado
kathyt1122@gmail.com
66.41.95.140

Submitted on 2014/03/12 at 1:30 pm

Does your hand look different? The xray and video are just like my hand. I’m having the surgery in 10 days.

Does your hand look different? The xray and video are just like my hand. I’m having the surgery in 10 days.

kathyt1122@gmail.com

Kathy Tirado

https://www.facebook.com/kathy.tirado

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2014/03/07 at 12:58 pm | In reply to Sharon.

Oh YES! We all know about “Kienbock”…But I have to say that I wish I didn’t!

Oh YES! We all know about "Kienbock"…But I have to say that I wish I didn’t!

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Sharon
sharon-fulton@hotmail.com
50.35.191.191

Submitted on 2014/03/07 at 12:57 pm

What you all have that involves the lunate bone (only lunate) is called “Kienbock” disease. It is somewhat rare and oftentimes not diagnosed properly since only expert orthopedists catch it. My daughter has it. Hers was caught before the complete death of the lunate and so an amazing hand surgeon in Seattle shortened her radius bone and plated that and then did a “live” bone graft from living bone tissue to what remained of the lunate bone to stop the necrosis. It would not regenerate the lunate but in theory would help keep it from dying completely if the graft worked and the lunate started receiving blood supply again. This condition is often caused by an elongated radius bone. Most of the time it is not caught until it is too late and the lunate is completely dead and crumbling or is almost there. It is usually only on one side but can be bilateral in some people. Just Google “Kienbock” disease or syndrome and you will get some info on it. My daughter was in high school when she was finally diagnosed. At first the pain in her wrist/arm/hand just was thought to be overuse or a sprain/strain since she worked at a job where she did lifting. Not the case though. Her surgery was successful. She is a lot weaker on that wrist/hand and it gets real cold during the cold damp winter months with that metal plate in the wrist but the lunate necrosis has stopped and she won’t have such bad arthritis in her older years because that bone will still be in place. She does not have the aching and pain that she once had. Good luck everyone!!!

Rob

Submitted on 2014/02/28 at 4:15 am

Guys……. had PRC in both wrists due to Osteoarthitis. Right wrist only 12 weeks ago and doing well. My experience with left wrist is excellent. Have regained much oif my strength and grip and 80 % pain relief. Some aching but well worth the Op

Guys……. had PRC in both wrists due to Osteoarthitis. Right wrist only 12 weeks ago and doing well. My experience with left wrist is excellent. Have regained much oif my strength and grip and 80 % pain relief. Some aching but well worth the Op

minicoopers@everjade.plus.com

Rob

Paul
Submitted on 2014/02/27 at 10:26 pm | In reply to George Eversole.

Geroge Eversole, I’m at the stage described in the first 4 lines of you post. I’ve read so many follow ups and this thread that I real hesitant to do It. I’ve been buildong a new home for the past year & a half and think it’s better to work in pain than not finish the project. I’m 68 and can’t understand why this should happen to such a young guy.
I’ve read some long term studies, like 10 years , that say no improvement!. Then I follow this thread and wonder if it’s the answer?

George Eversole

Submitted on 2014/02/27 at 5:01 pm

Had the procedure done on my left wrist about 9 months ago by a plastic surgeon whose specialty is hands. One of the bones was badly deteriorated from arthritis. I was in constant and extreme pain; and if I hit my hand on something, the pain would go through the roof. Now, only occasional pain if I happen to twist the wrist in some not-every-day way, and even then the pain is momentary and much, much less and more dull. I have equal range of motion with my right wrist; although strength is not quite what it used to be, it’s been less than a year and I have seen constant improvement since the operation. I was very skeptical, wondering how I’d get along without those 3 bones, but I couldn’t be more satisfied. I had no physical therapy, and was instructed to not purposely exercise the hand/wrist, but just use it naturally. GHE, Phoenix, 2-27-14

Had the procedure done on my left wrist about 9 months ago by a plastic surgeon whose specialty is hands. One of the bones was badly deteriorated from arthritis. I was in constant and extreme pain; and if I hit my hand on something, the pain would go through the roof. Now, only occasional pain if I happen to twist the wrist in some not-every-day way, and even then the pain is momentary and much, much less and more dull. I have equal range of motion with my right wrist; although strength is not quite what it used to be, it’s been less than a year and I have seen constant improvement since the operation. I was very skeptical, wondering how I’d get along without those 3 bones, but I couldn’t be more satisfied. I had no physical therapy, and was instructed to not purposely exercise the hand/wrist, but just use it naturally. GHE, Phoenix, 2-27-14

tonasco@msn.com

George Eversole

nick

Submitted on 2014/02/24 at 8:36 pm

ask your surgeon about a drug called Gabapenten its easy on the stomach,and I experience no side effects.I take 300 mgs every eight hrs. It relieved the pain and I’m able to sleep through the night.

ask your surgeon about a drug called Gabapenten its easy on the stomach,and I experience no side effects.I take 300 mgs every eight hrs. It relieved the pain and I’m able to sleep through the night.

nruopoli@yahoo.com

nick

Tracy

Submitted on 2014/02/21 at 2:09 pm | In reply to Josh Huffman.

I am not certain you will be able to do your same job as gripping strength and flexion are reduced. I am only 6+ weeks post surgery so this is only a limited observation.

I am not certain you will be able to do your same job as gripping strength and flexion are reduced. I am only 6+ weeks post surgery so this is only a limited observation.

 

Tracy

Samm

Submitted on 2014/02/17 at 11:42 am

Thanks for taking the time to comment I really appreciate it. I am seeing a hand specialist as well as other hand and wrist specialists in the dance community to gather as much information as possible. As well I have a saint austio/physiotherapist who’s worked with Circ.de.Sol and the Mtl Alouettes. Basically the reason a PRC was suggested is because my ligament is supposed to heal itself however my doctor does not think that it will. That being said, this surgery would relieve pain and my use, surgery or not, would be the same. Very limited. Also I think the reason he didnt recommend the 4 fussion is because i’m a dancer who trains every day and puts my body threw extreme physical endurance. This being said, i’m not sure a 4 fusion would hold or be my best option.
Also, ways that you can help yourself if ever you trip or fall from a dancers point of view: (As a clumsy person the risk of me falling is too high, even though im a dancer, once i learn this technique you never notice me falling or tripping because it’s done so smoothly and quietly).

Hold your arms inward, not crossed in an X position, but side my side with the palms towards your chest. When falling, human instinct is to throw our hands in front of us to catch us from falling on our faces or bums. If you are falling forward INTERNALLY rotate your leg so your knee points towards your other leg, your body will follow and you will fall in some form of weird fetal position. Practicing this technique is a great way to create body memory so if ever you fall you wont have to think about it, you’ll protect your body automatically. For falling backward, you want to perform the same internal rotation and you will fall again in the same position on your side. IMPORTANT to take note of: Your knee internally rotating will protect your knee cap as well as soften your fall to the floor. Holding your arms inward may seem scary at first, but its way better than reaching for nothing and falling on your poor wrists. Your bicep is cushiony and so is you bum/hip section of your body. They are meant to soften your fall. Falling backwards is a lot harder to master, however I feel its all in the body’s rotation. Use those obliques and dont just back flop on the floor or ice, rotate that body and use your cushions to absorb the ground in your fetal position. If you are in the Montreal area K.G. Guttman and Kelly Keanen are technical dancers who practice this type of absorption.

Hopefully you understand the gist of my explanation and I hope it’ll serve you well in your future god forbid you fall. Just remember, fight the human instinct to put your hands out, arms side by side with palms towards your chest. Even if you dont rotate quick enough, in my opinion its much better to fall on your stomach that way than risking further complication with an injury you’ve already come so far with.

Good luck and thank you for you help :)

Thanks for taking the time to comment I really appreciate it. I am seeing a hand specialist as well as other hand and wrist specialists in the dance community to gather as much information as possible. As well I have a saint austio/physiotherapist who’s worked with Circ.de.Sol and the Mtl Alouettes. Basically the reason a PRC was suggested is because my ligament is supposed to heal itself however my doctor does not think that it will. That being said, this surgery would relieve pain and my use, surgery or not, would be the same. Very limited. Also I think the reason he didnt recommend the 4 fussion is because i’m a dancer who trains every day and puts my body threw extreme physical endurance. This being said, i’m not sure a 4 fusion would hold or be my best option. Also, ways that you can help yourself if ever you trip or fall from a dancers point of view: (As a clumsy person the risk of me falling is too high, even though im a dancer, once i learn this technique you never notice me falling or tripping because it’s done so smoothly and quietly). Hold your arms inward, not crossed in an X position, but side my side with the palms towards your chest. When falling, human instinct is to throw our hands in front of us to catch us from falling on our faces or bums. If you are falling forward INTERNALLY rotate your leg so your knee points towards your other leg, your body will follow and you will fall in some form of weird fetal position. Practicing this technique is a great way to create body memory so if ever you fall you wont have to think about it, you’ll protect your body automatically. For falling backward, you want to perform the same internal rotation and you will fall again in the same position on your side. IMPORTANT to take note of: Your knee internally rotating will protect your knee cap as well as soften your fall to the floor. Holding your arms inward may seem scary at first, but its way better than reaching for nothing and falling on your poor wrists. Your bicep is cushiony and so is you bum/hip section of your body. They are meant to soften your fall. Falling backwards is a lot harder to master, however I feel its all in the body’s rotation. Use those obliques and dont just back flop on the floor or ice, rotate that body and use your cushions to absorb the ground in your fetal position. If you are in the Montreal area K.G. Guttman and Kelly Keanen are technical dancers who practice this type of absorption. Hopefully you understand the gist of my explanation and I hope it’ll serve you well in your future god forbid you fall. Just remember, fight the human instinct to put your hands out, arms side by side with palms towards your chest. Even if you dont rotate quick enough, in my opinion its much better to fall on your stomach that way than risking further complication with an injury you’ve already come so far with. Good luck and thank you for you help 🙂

loves2ride_19@hotmail.com

Samm

Mark

Submitted on 2014/02/17 at 11:16 am | In reply to Samm.

I had a PRC on my left wrist (non-dominant hand) about 7.5 months back due to scaphoid bone dying. I think mine has turned out better than most, not as good as a few. But I’m happy with it. In terms of what I can and can’t do…The range of motion is about half of what it is with my good wrist (in terms of moving my wrist in the direction of the palm and opposite the opposite direction). In terms of the motion involved when I make a fist and rotate my wrist in the plane of my thumb and pinky finger, I probably have only 25% (and maybe less) of the range of motion of my good hand. When it comes to me being able to apply weight or lift with my PRC hand, it is all about the angles. I can’t do a traditional push up. I can’t get the 90 degree angle between the hand and forearm to do the pushup. I can do push-ups if I use a bar (like those perfect pushup things you might see on TV) and position my hand correctly. I can support my weight on parallel bars (if I have the angle correct). I can pick up a 20Lb bag of dog food with my left hand. I would like to think that I can still do all the things I need to do with my left hand/wrist, I just need to pay attention to the angles, when I do it.

I have to admit that I don’t understand your ligament issue. What little I’ve been able to read on the internet always seem to involve bones that have died or chronic arthritis as the reason for the PRC. I think the dividing line regarding the age of 35 relates to younger people having a more active lifestyle that might put them in a position of forcing their wrist to go beyond the angles it can achieve after having the PRC. For example, I could probably go out and play some touch football or play softball, but the odds of me putting my left hand out to brace my fall could very well force my wrist beyond an angle that it can safely achieve. In my own mind, that alone would probably force the joint to fail with the only fall back being a full wrist fusion. One of my big fears (besides getting eaten by a shark) is that I will trip or slip on ice and put my left hand out to break my fall. Does that make sense?

You do not mention whether the doctor you are seeing is a certified hand surgeon. If you are not talking to a certified hand surgeon (hand specialist), then you need to. If the right bones are not damaged in your wrist, then a 4 corner fusion is an option. I get the impression that a 4 corner fusion is more durable and is recommended for people under 35. I haven’t seen anything that says there is too much difference in range of motion or strength when comparing 4 corner fusions to a PRC. But if the fusion takes and you don’t have any hardware failure, I get the impression that it can better take the wear and tear associated with being younger. The recovery period is longer for a 4 corner fusion, compared to PRC. I had the option of 4 corner fusion but chose PRC because it was my non-dominant hand and because the recovery time was shorter (if everything went as expected). If I ever had a problem with my right wrist, I would seriously consider a 4 corner fusion. And if the 4 corner fusion does fail, it might still be possible to fall back on having a PRC. If a PRC fails, the fall back is total wrist fusion.

Unfortunately, you can see from this web site, there is a wide range of possible outcomes. Maybe this is too much info but I hope it helps. Make sure you are talking to a certified hand surgeon and not a regular surgeon and not even an orthopedic surgeon.

I had a PRC on my left wrist (non-dominant hand) about 7.5 months back due to scaphoid bone dying. I think mine has turned out better than most, not as good as a few. But I’m happy with it. In terms of what I can and can’t do…The range of motion is about half of what it is with my good wrist (in terms of moving my wrist in the direction of the palm and opposite the opposite direction). In terms of the motion involved when I make a fist and rotate my wrist in the plane of my thumb and pinky finger, I probably have only 25% (and maybe less) of the range of motion of my good hand. When it comes to me being able to apply weight or lift with my PRC hand, it is all about the angles. I can’t do a traditional push up. I can’t get the 90 degree angle between the hand and forearm to do the pushup. I can do push-ups if I use a bar (like those perfect pushup things you might see on TV) and position my hand correctly. I can support my weight on parallel bars (if I have the angle correct). I can pick up a 20Lb bag of dog food with my left hand. I would like to think that I can still do all the things I need to do with my left hand/wrist, I just need to pay attention to the angles, when I do it. I have to admit that I don’t understand your ligament issue. What little I’ve been able to read on the internet always seem to involve bones that have died or chronic arthritis as the reason for the PRC. I think the dividing line regarding the age of 35 relates to younger people having a more active lifestyle that might put them in a position of forcing their wrist to go beyond the angles it can achieve after having the PRC. For example, I could probably go out and play some touch football or play softball, but the odds of me putting my left hand out to brace my fall could very well force my wrist beyond an angle that it can safely achieve. In my own mind, that alone would probably force the joint to fail with the only fall back being a full wrist fusion. One of my big fears (besides getting eaten by a shark) is that I will trip or slip on ice and put my left hand out to break my fall. Does that make sense? You do not mention whether the doctor you are seeing is a certified hand surgeon. If you are not talking to a certified hand surgeon (hand specialist), then you need to. If the right bones are not damaged in your wrist, then a 4 corner fusion is an option. I get the impression that a 4 corner fusion is more durable and is recommended for people under 35. I haven’t seen anything that says there is too much difference in range of motion or strength when comparing 4 corner fusions to a PRC. But if the fusion takes and you don’t have any hardware failure, I get the impression that it can better take the wear and tear associated with being younger. The recovery period is longer for a 4 corner fusion, compared to PRC. I had the option of 4 corner fusion but chose PRC because it was my non-dominant hand and because the recovery time was shorter (if everything went as expected). If I ever had a problem with my right wrist, I would seriously consider a 4 corner fusion. And if the 4 corner fusion does fail, it might still be possible to fall back on having a PRC. If a PRC fails, the fall back is total wrist fusion. Unfortunately, you can see from this web site, there is a wide range of possible outcomes. Maybe this is too much info but I hope it helps. Make sure you are talking to a certified hand surgeon and not a regular surgeon and not even an orthopedic surgeon.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

1

mmolloy1

Submitted on 2014/02/16 at 4:41 pm | In reply to nick.

an interesting cross section of results. My surgery was November 6, 2013. I have been to the physiotherapist regularly since my cast was off. I have approximately 50% of the movement I had pre op. The grip strength was 110 pounds before the operation, and was 101 last week. There is no pain, which was the deciding factor for me. The exercises are crucial for recovery. I can get up from a prone position with the wrist bearing full weight. From my perspective it has been successful for me, although the lack of wrist movement takes a bit to get used to, however I don’t really even notice it anymore. If there was a potential chance for a ligament recovery I would do that first. My issue was the arthritis causing the pain.

an interesting cross section of results. My surgery was November 6, 2013. I have been to the physiotherapist regularly since my cast was off. I have approximately 50% of the movement I had pre op. The grip strength was 110 pounds before the operation, and was 101 last week. There is no pain, which was the deciding factor for me. The exercises are crucial for recovery. I can get up from a prone position with the wrist bearing full weight. From my perspective it has been successful for me, although the lack of wrist movement takes a bit to get used to, however I don’t really even notice it anymore. If there was a potential chance for a ligament recovery I would do that first. My issue was the arthritis causing the pain.

mmolloy1@rogers.com

mmolloy1

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2014/02/16 at 2:36 pm | In reply to nick.

Not able to ride will be the worst!!!! I am modifying my bike to make it less difficult on my wrist. Brembo front brakes, malossi shocks, adjustable brake levers etc….

Not able to ride will be the worst!!!! I am modifying my bike to make it less difficult on my wrist. Brembo front brakes, malossi shocks, adjustable brake levers etc….

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

nick

Submitted on 2014/02/16 at 12:27 pm | In reply to Samm.

If I would have had any idea of the end result of my PRC I would have gotten a third opinion and even after that, I would have put my arm in a sling for at least 6 months and prayed for a healing before opting for the surgery.Asit stands right now,Im doing much better than some comments that Ive read,I can deal with the pain and stiffness,asit lessons week by week what concerns me is the weakness I am experiencing.I am now in my fourth month after surgery and I still cant do simple tasks,like openning a bottle cap or eating with a spoon,shavingor tieing my shoe. I have to wonder if I’ll ever be able to swing a hammer or ride my harley m/c again.

If I would have had any idea of the end result of my PRC I would have gotten a third opinion and even after that, I would have put my arm in a sling for at least 6 months and prayed for a healing before opting for the surgery.Asit stands right now,Im doing much better than some comments that Ive read,I can deal with the pain and stiffness,asit lessons week by week what concerns me is the weakness I am experiencing.I am now in my fourth month after surgery and I still cant do simple tasks,like openning a bottle cap or eating with a spoon,shavingor tieing my shoe. I have to wonder if I’ll ever be able to swing a hammer or ride my harley m/c again.

nruopoli@yahoo.com

nick

Samm

Submitted on 2014/02/16 at 7:53 am

Wow, well if a human ever weighs as little as a computer or grocery back I’ll be sure tomy partner with them. I’m guessing it’s the pain that is limiting you from doing more than your capacity?
Well this gives me lots to think about considering my other wrist is already shot as well. Thanks again imensally!

Wow, well if a human ever weighs as little as a computer or grocery back I’ll be sure tomy partner with them. I’m guessing it’s the pain that is limiting you from doing more than your capacity? Well this gives me lots to think about considering my other wrist is already shot as well. Thanks again imensally!

loves2ride_19@hotmail.com

Samm

Submitted on 2014/02/16 at 7:48 am | In reply to Samm.

I do not think that I will ever be able to bear my weight on my wrist. I can lift things but I have to be careful about the weight. Nope, personally I cannot. I can lift a bag of groceries, yesterday I shoveled snow and ran the snow blower for hours, I lifted a computer desk alone, I ride a motorcycle, but if I wanted to push myself up with my right hand from a lying down position to sitting, I think it may hurt.

I do not think that I will ever be able to bear my weight on my wrist. I can lift things but I have to be careful about the weight. Nope, personally I cannot. I can lift a bag of groceries, yesterday I shoveled snow and ran the snow blower for hours, I lifted a computer desk alone, I ride a motorcycle, but if I wanted to push myself up with my right hand from a lying down position to sitting, I think it may hurt.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Samm
loves2ride_19@hotmail.com
24.37.51.146

Submitted on 2014/02/16 at 7:44 am

Good to know as well as knowing my wrist will act more as a hinge than ball in socket. Post surgery, I can’t remember how long it’s been for you, are you able to bare or receive weight on your wrist? For example, if I’m thinking of my profession, could you lift, pull or support someone else’s and or your own body weight? If so, for seconds or does it truly depend on the day.
As a dancer i often take b-girl poses baring all my weight on my wrist (135pounds) as well as lift or support others body weight.
Thanks again you’re an amazing help!

Good to know as well as knowing my wrist will act more as a hinge than ball in socket. Post surgery, I can’t remember how long it’s been for you, are you able to bare or receive weight on your wrist? For example, if I’m thinking of my profession, could you lift, pull or support someone else’s and or your own body weight? If so, for seconds or does it truly depend on the day. As a dancer i often take b-girl poses baring all my weight on my wrist (135pounds) as well as lift or support others body weight. Thanks again you’re an amazing help!

loves2ride_19@hotmail.com

Samm

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
67.193.27.236

Submitted on 2014/02/16 at 7:37 am | In reply to Samm.

Hi,

Yes, you should be concerned about arthritis. My surgeon explained that I would be more pronged to arthritis now since there is no natural cartilage between the remaining bones.

Hi, Yes, you should be concerned about arthritis. My surgeon explained that I would be more pronged to arthritis now since there is no natural cartilage between the remaining bones.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Samm

Submitted on 2014/02/16 at 7:35 am

I’ve taken a few anatomy courses and basically because it’s a partial tair we can look at my ligament like a frade piece of wrope. It’s holding on by threads now but will regain it’s full wropes strength.
A FULL tare of a ligament is as if our ligament is still a rope holding the eight bones of our wrist in place, however this rope has been cut in two. It will never heal fully and physically tying it back together is the only way.
Although mine should heal 100% because it’s a partial tare it’s very unlikely. I’ve devoted already half a year with no use and my waiting will go over a year if I wait for surgery in December.
I’ve been doing some research and apparently PRC surgery doesn’t take well with people under 35. I am 21 in March of this year and regardless of the waiting time, because this is a 95% guarantied needed surgery, I’m starting to worry about long term effects such as arthritis and short term such as taking over a year to heal fully much like in the studies I’ve read.
Do you have any additional information on the age of the successful patients and an average heing time?

Thanks again for all your help it’s much appreciated !!!

I’ve taken a few anatomy courses and basically because it’s a partial tair we can look at my ligament like a frade piece of wrope. It’s holding on by threads now but will regain it’s full wropes strength. A FULL tare of a ligament is as if our ligament is still a rope holding the eight bones of our wrist in place, however this rope has been cut in two. It will never heal fully and physically tying it back together is the only way. Although mine should heal 100% because it’s a partial tare it’s very unlikely. I’ve devoted already half a year with no use and my waiting will go over a year if I wait for surgery in December. I’ve been doing some research and apparently PRC surgery doesn’t take well with people under 35. I am 21 in March of this year and regardless of the waiting time, because this is a 95% guarantied needed surgery, I’m starting to worry about long term effects such as arthritis and short term such as taking over a year to heal fully much like in the studies I’ve read. Do you have any additional information on the age of the successful patients and an average heing time? Thanks again for all your help it’s much appreciated !!!

loves2ride_19@hotmail.com

Samm

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2014/02/16 at 7:22 am | In reply to Samm.

Hi,

Wow, a dancer! Well, if it is at all possible for your ligaments to actually heal, then I would take the time off to allow for that in lieu of the surgery. From the blog feedback it appears that 30 % who have the surgery have excellent results. But you are clear that your wrist becomes a hinge and no longer a complex joint. Your body seems to make up for the loss of movement in many ways such as using your arm to turn, shoulder etc… In my case, I have lost much movement but have no pain. others seem to have more movement but pain. Again, if it is possible for the ligaments to heal, I would do what ever it takes to promote that before having the surgery. That is my nonmedical opinion.

Hi, Wow, a dancer! Well, if it is at all possible for your ligaments to actually heal, then I would take the time off to allow for that in lieu of the surgery. From the blog feedback it appears that 30 % who have the surgery have excellent results. But you are clear that your wrist becomes a hinge and no longer a complex joint. Your body seems to make up for the loss of movement in many ways such as using your arm to turn, shoulder etc… In my case, I have lost much movement but have no pain. others seem to have more movement but pain. Again, if it is possible for the ligaments to heal, I would do what ever it takes to promote that before having the surgery. That is my nonmedical opinion.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Samm
loves2ride_19@hotmail.com
24.37.51.146

Submitted on 2014/02/15 at 10:20 pm

I have been suggested to have a PRC Surgery on my left wrist. I am a professional contemporary dancer which means my entire body is my career and success. I was told i had partial tearing in my TFCC and other small ligaments between the lower four bones of the wrist. It has been half a year now and surgery is officially on the table. I was asked whether or not I wanted to wait till December of this year to allow my ligaments to possibly heal, although unlikely said by my Dr, or to have the surgery performed ASAP. I am currently getting my Bachelors of Fine Arts at Concordia University and although I am powering my way through the past year with one arm, i’m not sure if waiting is my best option.

I was wondering if there were any amongst you who do sports or, like the mechanic, need to use your wrist in strenuous ways on a daily basis. If so, how significant is the loss of motion? Is the pain the only thing limiting you from performing longer more demanding tasks with your wrist? Is it worth saving another six month wait to possibly but not likely avoid this surgery?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I will most likely be needing this surgery regardless, so i’ll be sure to post my recovery for you to monitor.

I have been suggested to have a PRC Surgery on my left wrist. I am a professional contemporary dancer which means my entire body is my career and success. I was told i had partial tearing in my TFCC and other small ligaments between the lower four bones of the wrist. It has been half a year now and surgery is officially on the table. I was asked whether or not I wanted to wait till December of this year to allow my ligaments to possibly heal, although unlikely said by my Dr, or to have the surgery performed ASAP. I am currently getting my Bachelors of Fine Arts at Concordia University and although I am powering my way through the past year with one arm, i’m not sure if waiting is my best option. I was wondering if there were any amongst you who do sports or, like the mechanic, need to use your wrist in strenuous ways on a daily basis. If so, how significant is the loss of motion? Is the pain the only thing limiting you from performing longer more demanding tasks with your wrist? Is it worth saving another six month wait to possibly but not likely avoid this surgery? Any help would be greatly appreciated. I will most likely be needing this surgery regardless, so i’ll be sure to post my recovery for you to monitor.

loves2ride_19@hotmail.com

Samm

, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2014/02/15 at 8:23 pm | In reply to Dianne.

That is wonderful news! :) I hope the rest of your recovery is as good as the first 9-days…

That is wonderful news! 🙂 I hope the rest of your recovery is as good as the first 9-days…

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Dianne
ken51@hotmail.ca
66.183.215.217

Submitted on 2014/02/15 at 7:08 pm

I am on day 9, had my cast removed on day 5, had brace put on and started my exercises. Was back to work in four days, with restrictions of course. It was my right wrist and I am right handed so it isn’t easy, but neither was having the pain I suffered for about 15 years before someone figured out what the problem was. I had a block and day surgery. It lasted one hour and I was awake for the whole thing. I took T3s for the pain till the next morning and Tylenol for a day or so after. So far, so good. I’m seeing improvements every day and have started my exercises. Best thing that ever happened. As far as information goes, the surgeon, in Vancouver BC, was very helpful for the most part and I had none of the problems others apparently had. I was done with living in pain so this surgery was a god send.

I am on day 9, had my cast removed on day 5, had brace put on and started my exercises. Was back to work in four days, with restrictions of course. It was my right wrist and I am right handed so it isn’t easy, but neither was having the pain I suffered for about 15 years before someone figured out what the problem was. I had a block and day surgery. It lasted one hour and I was awake for the whole thing. I took T3s for the pain till the next morning and Tylenol for a day or so after. So far, so good. I’m seeing improvements every day and have started my exercises. Best thing that ever happened. As far as information goes, the surgeon, in Vancouver BC, was very helpful for the most part and I had none of the problems others apparently had. I was done with living in pain so this surgery was a god send.

ken51@hotmail.ca

Dianne

Martha
mommymartha@gmail.com
71.211.96.64

Submitted on 2014/02/13 at 6:43 am

Thanks it’s so reassuring to know someone gets how frustrating this procedure is to my daily life with two young kids. It is really unpredictable. Some days I feel like this rare disease is blessing that helps me slow down and think and other days it just fuels my resentment for all the things I struggle to do. I m off prescription pain killers and just on pm Motrin.i have amazing physical therapist I can only see one time a week . I will attemp to do the hand excercise more often because you seem so so much more positive on you recovery. I’m kind of stuck at. Day 60
Martha. Hot am baths really help along with no looking back.

Thanks it’s so reassuring to know someone gets how frustrating this procedure is to my daily life with two young kids. It is really unpredictable. Some days I feel like this rare disease is blessing that helps me slow down and think and other days it just fuels my resentment for all the things I struggle to do. I m off prescription pain killers and just on pm Motrin.i have amazing physical therapist I can only see one time a week . I will attemp to do the hand excercise more often because you seem so so much more positive on you recovery. I’m kind of stuck at. Day 60 Martha. Hot am baths really help along with no looking back.

mommymartha@gmail.com

Martha

Paul

Submitted on 2014/02/12 at 7:41 pm

I too am awaiting my decision to do the PRC. Much of what I read says it’s not all that special in the lo0ng term.
Glad to find this update post. Each day the pain is worse, but I’m not sold yet. I’m a real active 68 and don’t do well when sedentary.

I too am awaiting my decision to do the PRC. Much of what I read says it’s not all that special in the lo0ng term. Glad to find this update post. Each day the pain is worse, but I’m not sold yet. I’m a real active 68 and don’t do well when sedentary.

PaulDobbin@aol.com

Paul

Harold woods

Submitted on 2014/02/11 at 4:10 pm

I had the PRC done in June of 2011 @ kutch and Kleinert here in Lou key was in a cast for 6 weeks but was using my fingers and thumb after only a couple days only off work a week but was back on light duty . After having the cast removed I didn’t do very much PT and went back to full duty. Has been great. Before surgery every time I hit my hand on anything the pain was terrible I was getting cortisone shots every 3 mo. For almost 2 years . Very glad I finally did it it’s changed my life . I’m 56 and mine was from osteoarthritis

Debbie

Submitted on 2014/02/08 at 9:27 pm | In reply to Joann.

I also had my surgery in Erie, PA in October 2008. I had no luck finding out information about this surgery prior to my surgery on the internet. I had an accident with a fractured capitate bone and it wasn’t until a year and a half later that I had arthroscopic surgery only to find out I had completely torn ligaments and a significant amount of arthritis that led me to the PRC. I found the surgery to be very painful and slow healing. I returned to work two months post op. My job requires me to work on a computer for the better part of the day. I went thru PT and some cortisone injections over the next year. I found the pain was quite severe and I also was thinking of going for a disability retirement. Luckily I had a wonderful doctor that did not give up on me. In January of 2009 my doctor prescribed iontophoresis. I had never heard of this but I had this treatment done at the PT office. I had 2-3 treatments per week for a month and I can’t say enough good about the treatment. I am basically pain free now! I know when I have overused it but I also know my wrist will be fine if I give it some rest for the next day or so. My strength is pretty much back to what it was pre surgery days but of course the range of motion has limitations. My surgeon did a cut across my wrist so that the scar is basically hidden in the wrist creases. Being a female this was much appreciated! The biggest thing I cannot do is put pressure directly on the wrist area as you would do during a push up. It’s better to be pain free to me though!

I also had my surgery in Erie, PA in October 2008. I had no luck finding out information about this surgery prior to my surgery on the internet. I had an accident with a fractured capitate bone and it wasn’t until a year and a half later that I had arthroscopic surgery only to find out I had completely torn ligaments and a significant amount of arthritis that led me to the PRC. I found the surgery to be very painful and slow healing. I returned to work two months post op. My job requires me to work on a computer for the better part of the day. I went thru PT and some cortisone injections over the next year. I found the pain was quite severe and I also was thinking of going for a disability retirement. Luckily I had a wonderful doctor that did not give up on me. In January of 2009 my doctor prescribed iontophoresis. I had never heard of this but I had this treatment done at the PT office. I had 2-3 treatments per week for a month and I can’t say enough good about the treatment. I am basically pain free now! I know when I have overused it but I also know my wrist will be fine if I give it some rest for the next day or so. My strength is pretty much back to what it was pre surgery days but of course the range of motion has limitations. My surgeon did a cut across my wrist so that the scar is basically hidden in the wrist creases. Being a female this was much appreciated! The biggest thing I cannot do is put pressure directly on the wrist area as you would do during a push up. It’s better to be pain free to me though!

grammyd0731@yahoo.com

Debbie

Submitted on 2014/02/06 at 6:31 am | In reply to Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner.

Day one begins today! I am checking to see if your site works and how it works. PRC Procedure at 3:30.

Day one begins today! I am checking to see if your site works and how it works. PRC Procedure at 3:30.

bhaynes821@hotmail.com

jbhaynes1970

http://bhaynes821.wordpress.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2014/02/04 at 4:07 pm | In reply to Josh Huffman.

I can do most of the things I did before but I am a computer guy and I ride a motorcycle. I think shocks like a hammer or chain saw would irritate it. But it is not yet a year. I will be posting an update shortly with a video of things I can do. Am I happy about the surgery? Heck no. Is there worse things in life? Heck yes. I think the lifting would be an issue.

I can do most of the things I did before but I am a computer guy and I ride a motorcycle. I think shocks like a hammer or chain saw would irritate it. But it is not yet a year. I will be posting an update shortly with a video of things I can do. Am I happy about the surgery? Heck no. Is there worse things in life? Heck yes. I think the lifting would be an issue.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Josh Huffman

Submitted on 2014/02/04 at 3:30 pm

I’m 33 I work on a drilling rig and I’m about to have that surgery next week I’m scared to death that I won’t b able to work anymore after I have it …same problem as u artery was damaged to the lunate and it’s collapsing …how’s the strength in ur wrist ? Can u tell any difference ? Please any input would help me thank u

I’m 33 I work on a drilling rig and I’m about to have that surgery next week I’m scared to death that I won’t b able to work anymore after I have it …same problem as u artery was damaged to the lunate and it’s collapsing …how’s the strength in ur wrist ? Can u tell any difference ? Please any input would help me thank u

Solocam29@yahoo.com

Josh Huffman

martha cudiihy

Submitted on 2014/01/28 at 1:41 pm

thank you so much for this post. it makes me feel not so depressed and angry. i am getting use to looking at scar on front and back of writst. reading this makes me realize all that i can do, plastic bag opening gives me hope, This is the first time i am typing with no cast or brace. Need to get over being angry and start listening to the pain. I usualy just eat or yell or drink when i feel any kind of pain, For me the toughest part of this recovery is the emotional and really needed to slow down, trying to stop being so afriad to be in crowds. this post means a lot to me…

thank you so much for this post. it makes me feel not so depressed and angry. i am getting use to looking at scar on front and back of writst. reading this makes me realize all that i can do, plastic bag opening gives me hope, This is the first time i am typing with no cast or brace. Need to get over being angry and start listening to the pain. I usualy just eat or yell or drink when i feel any kind of pain, For me the toughest part of this recovery is the emotional and really needed to slow down, trying to stop being so afriad to be in crowds. this post means a lot to me…

mommymartha@gmail.com

martha cudiihy

Ken Banker

Submitted on 2014/01/16 at 8:51 am

Ken I had PRC on December 18 2013. The pain I had before the surgery is completely gone. I have almost no swelling and am using my hand and wrist with very little pain. I am very glad I had the surgery. I have my first physical therapy today. All my fingers work fine and each day they are getting stronger. I was able to return to work on January 2 2014 and use my hand and wrist everyday with some restrictions. I can move my wrist in both directions. My thumb is the weakest so far but is improving everyday. I am very happy I had the surgery and do not think it will be to long before I don’t notice much of a difference form pre-surgery. I believe the power of prayer has a lot to do with the healing to.

Ken I had PRC on December 18 2013. The pain I had before the surgery is completely gone. I have almost no swelling and am using my hand and wrist with very little pain. I am very glad I had the surgery. I have my first physical therapy today. All my fingers work fine and each day they are getting stronger. I was able to return to work on January 2 2014 and use my hand and wrist everyday with some restrictions. I can move my wrist in both directions. My thumb is the weakest so far but is improving everyday. I am very happy I had the surgery and do not think it will be to long before I don’t notice much of a difference form pre-surgery. I believe the power of prayer has a lot to do with the healing to.

jbanker@ezwebtech.com

Ken Banker

Mark

Submitted on 2014/01/15 at 12:39 pm

I’m currently 6.5 months post-surgery. I’m pretty happy with how things turned out. I still have some discomfort on the back and palm side of the wrist when I rotate my hand back (away from the palm). But that discomfort seems to be getting more muted as the months go by. I don’t feel like I’m restricted in any way, but I have to pay attention to the angles when using my left hand. I don’t seem to be thinking as much about my left hand. Early on, I was always thinking about it. The fingers don’t get as stiff in the morning as then did 3 months ago (or I’ve just gotten used to it…maybe a little bit of both). I don’t really do any specific exercises with my PRC hand. Mostly because I’m lazy. Maybe some of the discomfort I feel now would disappear sooner if I followed some kind of exercise plan. In a couple months I’ll start swinging a golf club regularly. Then I’ll have a better feel for what kind of progress my wrist has made.

I’m currently 6.5 months post-surgery. I’m pretty happy with how things turned out. I still have some discomfort on the back and palm side of the wrist when I rotate my hand back (away from the palm). But that discomfort seems to be getting more muted as the months go by. I don’t feel like I’m restricted in any way, but I have to pay attention to the angles when using my left hand. I don’t seem to be thinking as much about my left hand. Early on, I was always thinking about it. The fingers don’t get as stiff in the morning as then did 3 months ago (or I’ve just gotten used to it…maybe a little bit of both). I don’t really do any specific exercises with my PRC hand. Mostly because I’m lazy. Maybe some of the discomfort I feel now would disappear sooner if I followed some kind of exercise plan. In a couple months I’ll start swinging a golf club regularly. Then I’ll have a better feel for what kind of progress my wrist has made.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

Dawn

Submitted on 2014/01/14 at 10:00 pm

Thank you so much for all of your abundant information on PRC !!My husband will be having this surgery on Monday. I have been scouring the web for answers and after taking questions, researching and answering he has one question oustanding … Do you know how long the actual surgery will last? Approximately ?? Thank you !

Thank you so much for all of your abundant information on PRC !!My husband will be having this surgery on Monday. I have been scouring the web for answers and after taking questions, researching and answering he has one question oustanding … Do you know how long the actual surgery will last? Approximately ?? Thank you !

retsel6@yahoo.com

Dawn

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2014/01/12 at 10:53 pm

David, I also had my surgery in September 2013. Although I am not having the same issues you are, I am having issues. Specifically with the thumb of my PRC hand. Seems I have developed a form of tendonitis at the base of that thumb as a result of having the PRC surgery. I will find out in about 5 weeks if I will be needing a second surgery to relieve the pain from the tendonitis.. they call it Dequervane Syndrome. I think the surgery is similar to a carpal tunnel one only at the base of the thumb.
I have made good progress on my range of motion… just about half back both directions in just over 3 months. I still have considerably less strength in the hand but I squeeze play doh a few times a day… I find that easier and less painful than the medical putty I got from occupational therapy.
My surgeon told me it could take up to 18 months to fully recover from the surgery so some patients is a must. I still have swelling in the fingers but a good soak in the tub gets everything loosened up so I can get the hand and fingers moving to work some of the stiffness and swelling out.
I have just been released from hand therapy and was given the green light to begin taking my dogs back to training and shooting my hand guns again. I was told by both the surgeon and hand therapists the more I use it the faster it will come back and pain is my only limiting factor. I just hate the pain in my thumb from the tendons being compressed as its an almost constant pain.. almost as bad as before the surgery… certainly it’s just as limiting.

David, I also had my surgery in September 2013. Although I am not having the same issues you are, I am having issues. Specifically with the thumb of my PRC hand. Seems I have developed a form of tendonitis at the base of that thumb as a result of having the PRC surgery. I will find out in about 5 weeks if I will be needing a second surgery to relieve the pain from the tendonitis.. they call it Dequervane Syndrome. I think the surgery is similar to a carpal tunnel one only at the base of the thumb. I have made good progress on my range of motion… just about half back both directions in just over 3 months. I still have considerably less strength in the hand but I squeeze play doh a few times a day… I find that easier and less painful than the medical putty I got from occupational therapy. My surgeon told me it could take up to 18 months to fully recover from the surgery so some patients is a must. I still have swelling in the fingers but a good soak in the tub gets everything loosened up so I can get the hand and fingers moving to work some of the stiffness and swelling out. I have just been released from hand therapy and was given the green light to begin taking my dogs back to training and shooting my hand guns again. I was told by both the surgeon and hand therapists the more I use it the faster it will come back and pain is my only limiting factor. I just hate the pain in my thumb from the tendons being compressed as its an almost constant pain.. almost as bad as before the surgery… certainly it’s just as limiting.

dewgrls.back@gmail.com

Cristy Prior

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2014/01/06 at 5:47 pm | In reply to randy98201ranman9.

Welcome to the hinged wrist club! I sincerely hope that all goes well with your surgery and that you are up and about as quickly as possible. What was the reason for the PRC?

Welcome to the hinged wrist club! I sincerely hope that all goes well with your surgery and that you are up and about as quickly as possible. What was the reason for the PRC?

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2014/01/06 at 4:01 pm

My name is Randy Reynolds, I am 58 years old & have been a carpenter for over 40 years, I will be having the PRC surgery in two weeks. Found this website to be the most helpful in what to expect. I am not exactly sure of my condition in the wrist for much of it seems technical in Dr. terms. was told ( CT results show arthritis is more advanced than it appeared on X Ray.) Just want to say hello and will post questions as I reed more. Thanks for your website. Randy

My name is Randy Reynolds, I am 58 years old & have been a carpenter for over 40 years, I will be having the PRC surgery in two weeks. Found this website to be the most helpful in what to expect. I am not exactly sure of my condition in the wrist for much of it seems technical in Dr. terms. was told ( CT results show arthritis is more advanced than it appeared on X Ray.) Just want to say hello and will post questions as I reed more. Thanks for your website. Randy

randy98201@gmail.com

randy98201ranman9

Mike
mmolloy1@rogers.com
72.138.191.14

Submitted on 2014/01/03 at 4:59 pm | In reply to Philip.

I had a PRC performed on November 6 of this year. The scars have healed very well, and the pain from the surgery was less than the pain caused by the arthritis in the joint. Therapy is ongoing. I was squeezing 110 lbs. pressure and am back to 60 lbs. after one week of physio. I am pleased so far with the progress, and will keep you informed.

I had a PRC performed on November 6 of this year. The scars have healed very well, and the pain from the surgery was less than the pain caused by the arthritis in the joint. Therapy is ongoing. I was squeezing 110 lbs. pressure and am back to 60 lbs. after one week of physio. I am pleased so far with the progress, and will keep you informed.

mmolloy1@rogers.com

Mike

Joann

Submitted on 2013/12/22 at 10:41 pm

I had my surgery in the middle of May 2013. I still have pain. My doctor will not let me lift anymore than ten pounds. I have limited movement of my right wrist and I am right handed. I had swelling for a while so that doesnt surprise me about your hand. It will take time for the swelling to go away. I would have to suggest to move your fingers as much as possible.. I know it hurts but I did a lot of typing and I think that movement helped me. Hang in there :)

I had my surgery in the middle of May 2013. I still have pain. My doctor will not let me lift anymore than ten pounds. I have limited movement of my right wrist and I am right handed. I had swelling for a while so that doesnt surprise me about your hand. It will take time for the swelling to go away. I would have to suggest to move your fingers as much as possible.. I know it hurts but I did a lot of typing and I think that movement helped me. Hang in there 🙂

soberjo06@yahoo.com

Joann

David Mayes
proximarowcarpectomy.com

Submitted on 2013/12/22 at 8:44 pm

I had general anesthesia. I told him I did not want to be awake through it. They also did carpal tunnel surgery at the same time and removed a pain sensory nerve in the arm.

I had general anesthesia. I told him I did not want to be awake through it. They also did carpal tunnel surgery at the same time and removed a pain sensory nerve in the arm.

davidlmayes7901@att.net

David Mayes

http://proximarowcarpectomy.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/12/22 at 8:23 pm | In reply to David Mayes.

Hi,

I know what you mean exactly. I have little to no pain but I am weak when doing certain things. My fingers and thumb is still stiff in the morning and will get stiff if I work them. I struggle with snow removal, cutting vegetables and so on. Question, Did you have a nerve block to freeze your arm for the surgery? I am trying to find some rhyme or reason to why some have success and others do not.

Hi, I know what you mean exactly. I have little to no pain but I am weak when doing certain things. My fingers and thumb is still stiff in the morning and will get stiff if I work them. I struggle with snow removal, cutting vegetables and so on. Question, Did you have a nerve block to freeze your arm for the surgery? I am trying to find some rhyme or reason to why some have success and others do not.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

David Mayes
proximarowcarpectomy.com

Submitted on 2013/12/22 at 12:14 pm

My name is Dave Mayes from Crawfordsville Indiana. I had the surgery in September of 2013. So far the only thing I think that is better than before the surgery is the pain I was having in my wrist. I am a mobile equipment Mechanic and it is necessary that I have strength and mobility in my hands to do my job. I still have very little strength in my right hand and it swells up daily. Since the surgery I have begun to have a lot of pain in my right shoulder. I cant raise my arm up to the side without extreme pain. When I put ice on my wrist to take the swelling down it hurts my shoulder so bad that I have to remove the ice from my wrist. I ask the doctor about this and he said he doesn’t know what would cause that. Blames it on another issue. So needless to say so far I am not really satisfied with the results of my surgery. I just pray it gets better.

My name is Dave Mayes from Crawfordsville Indiana. I had the surgery in September of 2013. So far the only thing I think that is better than before the surgery is the pain I was having in my wrist. I am a mobile equipment Mechanic and it is necessary that I have strength and mobility in my hands to do my job. I still have very little strength in my right hand and it swells up daily. Since the surgery I have begun to have a lot of pain in my right shoulder. I cant raise my arm up to the side without extreme pain. When I put ice on my wrist to take the swelling down it hurts my shoulder so bad that I have to remove the ice from my wrist. I ask the doctor about this and he said he doesn’t know what would cause that. Blames it on another issue. So needless to say so far I am not really satisfied with the results of my surgery. I just pray it gets better.

davidlmayes7901@att.net

David Mayes

http://proximarowcarpectomy.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca
peter.sanderson@outlook.com
67.193.27.236

Submitted on 2013/12/09 at 11:57 am | In reply to Blake Childress.

Ok, I have little pain but I do have stiffness and sore fingers. I do not know why.

Ok, I have little pain but I do have stiffness and sore fingers. I do not know why.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Blake Childress

Submitted on 2013/12/09 at 11:01 am

I too have had the PRC procedure and could not be more pleased with the results. It has now been almost a year to the day and there is nothing that I cannot do with the right wrist that I could not do before. There is no pain to speak of. Occasionally some minor stiffness on the outside if the wrist but that is the only discomfort.

It took nearly 10 weeks for all of the swelling to subside. At that point I went back into the gym. I am 62 years old and work out at least 3 to 4 times per week. It has taken 6 months to work my way back to curling 25 lbs in each hand. I have to keep the wrist in the vitical position rather than the horizontal but there is absolutely no pain.

The only discomfort I have is the motion of swinging a hammer. Even the motion of swinging my golf clubs has not been an issue. My doctors advice, just use it. The left wrist is scheduled for early next year as it too is just worn out.

I too have had the PRC procedure and could not be more pleased with the results. It has now been almost a year to the day and there is nothing that I cannot do with the right wrist that I could not do before. There is no pain to speak of. Occasionally some minor stiffness on the outside if the wrist but that is the only discomfort. It took nearly 10 weeks for all of the swelling to subside. At that point I went back into the gym. I am 62 years old and work out at least 3 to 4 times per week. It has taken 6 months to work my way back to curling 25 lbs in each hand. I have to keep the wrist in the vitical position rather than the horizontal but there is absolutely no pain. The only discomfort I have is the motion of swinging a hammer. Even the motion of swinging my golf clubs has not been an issue. My doctors advice, just use it. The left wrist is scheduled for early next year as it too is just worn out.

Childressab@cdmsmith.com

Blake Childress

nancy

Submitted on 2013/12/09 at 10:05 am

Hope it’s not necessary, but total wrist replacement is better than fusion. Retains partial motion. Had it done in 2012

Hope it’s not necessary, but total wrist replacement is better than fusion. Retains partial motion. Had it done in 2012

nnfoster@gmail.com

nancy

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/12/09 at 9:52 am | In reply to Mark.

Mark,

You are very very lucky to be in that 30 percent success statistic. I still am not sure where I fit in. I definitely do not have the pain like others who have commented. BUT, I would prefer to be like you.

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca x

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/12/09 at 9:41 am | In reply to Mark.

Hi,

I think he needs to see the MRI himself before judgment.

Sent from my Windows Phone Peter Sanderson – Personal E-Mail Account Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com Home – 613-933-3055 Personal Blog – http://www.vespaadventures.ca Business – http://www.tqms.com Business Phone – 613-577-4417 ________________________________

Hi, I think he needs to see the MRI himself before judgment. Sent from my Windows Phone Peter Sanderson – Personal E-Mail Account Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com Home – 613-933-3055 Personal Blog – http://www.vespaadventures.ca Business – http://www.tqms.com Business Phone – 613-577-4417 ________________________________

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Mark

Submitted on 2013/12/09 at 8:53 am

Interesting. I get that a PRC is a ‘salvage’ operation. I get that people react differently to the operation. However, at least in the eyes of the technician who analyzed the MRI, there were some abnormalities (the possible bone fragment and the tendon signal) that warranted further investigation. Maybe these abnormalities amount to something significant. Maybe not. What would frustrate me about this is the doctor trying to immediately rationalize all that away into being a part of the variability of having a PRC. In my opinion, the doctor should have more of a ‘let’s take a closer look at the data and see it means’ approach. I admit that all I have to go by is the summary you provided and maybe I read it with the wrong perspective. I’m kind of spring loaded toward frowning on people that rationalize an issue away without properly looking at the details (data) that pertain to the issue.

On the one hand (pardon the pun), I think it is encouraging that the MRI found some things that deserve a closer look (I hate taking my car to the mechanic and having him say that they can’t find anything wrong when it is obvious that it is not working correctly). However, it is all a moot point if nothing can be done about those abnormalities. Since I have an engineering background, I feel that there should be a proper explanation for everything.

Good luck. Hopefully if there is a bone fragment left in your wrist, you can have it removed and it results in noticeable improvement in your wrist/hand. I’m kind of curious about what the explanation might be in regards the return signal on that one tendon.

As far as vibrations, my hand therapist said that early on vibrations (like those associated with lawn mowers, for example) will cause discomfort in the wrist. But he also said over time it will get better. About 6 weeks ago, I did use a chain saw to cut up some limbs that had fallen after a wind storm. I was surprised by how little my wrist bothered me. Since my left wrist is the PRC wrist, I was a little concerned about the chain saw kicking back unexpectedly.

I rarely wear my wrist brace. I did wear it the other day when I was doing some hiking. One of my fears is that I will trip and fall and put my left arm out to brace my fall and muck up my wrist. My other big fear is being eaten by a shark.

Interesting. I get that a PRC is a ‘salvage’ operation. I get that people react differently to the operation. However, at least in the eyes of the technician who analyzed the MRI, there were some abnormalities (the possible bone fragment and the tendon signal) that warranted further investigation. Maybe these abnormalities amount to something significant. Maybe not. What would frustrate me about this is the doctor trying to immediately rationalize all that away into being a part of the variability of having a PRC. In my opinion, the doctor should have more of a ‘let’s take a closer look at the data and see it means’ approach. I admit that all I have to go by is the summary you provided and maybe I read it with the wrong perspective. I’m kind of spring loaded toward frowning on people that rationalize an issue away without properly looking at the details (data) that pertain to the issue. On the one hand (pardon the pun), I think it is encouraging that the MRI found some things that deserve a closer look (I hate taking my car to the mechanic and having him say that they can’t find anything wrong when it is obvious that it is not working correctly). However, it is all a moot point if nothing can be done about those abnormalities. Since I have an engineering background, I feel that there should be a proper explanation for everything. Good luck. Hopefully if there is a bone fragment left in your wrist, you can have it removed and it results in noticeable improvement in your wrist/hand. I’m kind of curious about what the explanation might be in regards the return signal on that one tendon. As far as vibrations, my hand therapist said that early on vibrations (like those associated with lawn mowers, for example) will cause discomfort in the wrist. But he also said over time it will get better. About 6 weeks ago, I did use a chain saw to cut up some limbs that had fallen after a wind storm. I was surprised by how little my wrist bothered me. Since my left wrist is the PRC wrist, I was a little concerned about the chain saw kicking back unexpectedly. I rarely wear my wrist brace. I did wear it the other day when I was doing some hiking. One of my fears is that I will trip and fall and put my left arm out to brace my fall and muck up my wrist. My other big fear is being eaten by a shark.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/12/04 at 6:35 am | In reply to pam.

Pam, I am not a doctor but I too have issues with my thumb. What exactly is your issue? Does it hurt at the base, stiff or swollen?

Pam, I am not a doctor but I too have issues with my thumb. What exactly is your issue? Does it hurt at the base, stiff or swollen?

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

pam

Submitted on 2013/12/04 at 5:49 am

I had this surgery done in June it is now Nov. I can’t grip with my hand I can’t open a jar or even a pop can. I am right handed which is the hand that had the surgery. My problem is my thumb does not work right. I have little use of it. The dr. Is dumbfounded by it. My thumb was fine before surgery I dont know what to do now about my thumb. Any help would be appreciated!! Thanks!

I had this surgery done in June it is now Nov. I can’t grip with my hand I can’t open a jar or even a pop can. I am right handed which is the hand that had the surgery. My problem is my thumb does not work right. I have little use of it. The dr. Is dumbfounded by it. My thumb was fine before surgery I dont know what to do now about my thumb. Any help would be appreciated!! Thanks!

pa_bels@yahoo.com

pam

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2013/11/25 at 3:34 pm

At just over 8 weeks now it’s been discovered I have de Quervain Syndrome in my PRC hand. It’s a form of tendonitis in the meaty part of the thumb. So along with the occupational therapy to regain range of motion I am also getting therapy to deal with this new development.
My range of motion is coming along nicely, I was able to move my hand and wrist well enough to make a door wreath and a mantle piece for Christmas.
The wrist flexor splint they have me wearing at night is beyond awkward and uncomfortable. I will be glad to be done with it! There is a lot I can now do that I couldn’t several weeks ago but still a lot that I can’t do yet

At just over 8 weeks now it’s been discovered I have de Quervain Syndrome in my PRC hand. It’s a form of tendonitis in the meaty part of the thumb. So along with the occupational therapy to regain range of motion I am also getting therapy to deal with this new development. My range of motion is coming along nicely, I was able to move my hand and wrist well enough to make a door wreath and a mantle piece for Christmas. The wrist flexor splint they have me wearing at night is beyond awkward and uncomfortable. I will be glad to be done with it! There is a lot I can now do that I couldn’t several weeks ago but still a lot that I can’t do yet

dewgrls.back@gmail.com

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2013/11/21 at 6:34 pm

I am a couple weeks short of 4 months, I find similar comparable problems, however, I work as a bank teller and find that counting money is extremely aggravating and have been recommended to actually wear brace at work at all times work shorter shifts and ice every couple hours. Strengthening is coming very slowly. I am enjoying reading your updates. Thank you. Sandy

I am a couple weeks short of 4 months, I find similar comparable problems, however, I work as a bank teller and find that counting money is extremely aggravating and have been recommended to actually wear brace at work at all times work shorter shifts and ice every couple hours. Strengthening is coming very slowly. I am enjoying reading your updates. Thank you. Sandy

sandycorbett246@hotmail.com

Sandy

5-Months Update | Proximal Row Carpectomy – PRC

Submitted on 2013/11/21 at 9:19 am

[…] Well it is exactly five months after my Proximal Row Carpectomy and I still have a hand. I received the CT-Scan report and according to the radiographer who read it, my hand is quite unremarkable considering I had a PRC. That means that they found everything to be as expected. Below is a copy of the CT-Scan Report for those of you who can read it. Additionally, I Posted the CT-Scan pictures and video at https://proximalrowcarpectomy.com/2013/11/01/ct-scan/. […]

[…] Well it is exactly five months after my Proximal Row Carpectomy and I still have a hand. I received the CT-Scan report and according to the radiographer who read it, my hand is quite unremarkable considering I had a PRC. That means that they found everything to be as expected. Below is a copy of the CT-Scan Report for those of you who can read it. Additionally, I Posted the CT-Scan pictures and video at https://proximalrowcarpectomy.com/2013/11/01/ct-scan/. […]

5-Months Update | Proximal Row Carpectomy – PRC

https://proximalrowcarpectomy.com/2013/11/21/5-months-update/

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/11/18 at 3:22 pm | In reply to Rod.

Hi,

I will send this to my surgeon who will answer and I will post it.

Hi, I will send this to my surgeon who will answer and I will post it.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Rod

Submitted on 2013/11/18 at 2:39 pm

I am having a PRC December 3rd. While I have many questions, my main questin is related to the wrist/forearm relationship after the row of bones are removed. How is the wrist attached to the forearm when you remove the bones that are attached to the forearm?

I am having a PRC December 3rd. While I have many questions, my main questin is related to the wrist/forearm relationship after the row of bones are removed. How is the wrist attached to the forearm when you remove the bones that are attached to the forearm?

rohaymo@yahoo.com

Rod

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/11/12 at 9:38 am | In reply to Cristy Prior.

Hi,

That sounds different. I received a nerve block whereby they inject a nerve blocking agent into my shoulder that freezes my arm and then they put me under for the operation because I choose to not be awake. The nerve block does have risks and one of those risks is nerve damage. They warned me of this beforehand but the risks were low. I personally think I had some nerve damage in my fingers that is slowly going away.

Thanks, ________________________

Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com

Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________

Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

Hi, That sounds different. I received a nerve block whereby they inject a nerve blocking agent into my shoulder that freezes my arm and then they put me under for the operation because I choose to not be awake. The nerve block does have risks and one of those risks is nerve damage. They warned me of this beforehand but the risks were low. I personally think I had some nerve damage in my fingers that is slowly going away. Thanks, ________________________ Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________ Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2013/11/12 at 9:30 am | In reply to Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner.

I’m not really sure if I did or not. I don’t remember them saying if they did a nerve block. I do know when I woke up and for just about the rest of the day my hand and fingers were numb

I’m not really sure if I did or not. I don’t remember them saying if they did a nerve block. I do know when I woke up and for just about the rest of the day my hand and fingers were numb

dewgrls.back@gmail.com

Cristy Prior

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/11/10 at 8:39 pm | In reply to Cristy Prior.

Hi,

Did you have a nerve block to freeze your wrist for the surgery?

Thanks, ________________________

Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com

Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________

Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

Hi, Did you have a nerve block to freeze your wrist for the surgery? Thanks, ________________________ Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________ Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2013/11/10 at 1:33 am

A to return to my Dr this past week as I have been having horrible muscle spasms in my ring and pinky fingers of the PRC hand. After some bending and tapping on the elbow, the surgeon believes there is ulnar nerve irrigation and inflammation. He also thinks the tendon controlling movement o those finger is also inflamed. He started me on muscle relaxes twice a day. If is not improved when I go back in two weeks he will end me for a nerve function test to look for possible nerve damage.
I got my new set of measurements this past Monday a 7° improvement one direction and5° the other. There is talking of putting me into a special brace at night that will slowly an gently force my hand to stay in a slight flexed position while I sleep to try to improve the flexation of e wrist downward.
Probably this Monday my therapist will have me start not wearing the brace at all unless out in public. Have been til it will probably be another 7-8 weeks before they will begin remove the lifting restriction I’m under. It will also be after the new year before they will consider letting my try taking the dogs back to training. I honestly feel that if the wrist would pop (like your knuckles do) it would feel a lot better and not like something in there is on the verge of breaking lol.
This was my end of day 44. Still a long road ahead of me but I’m getting there.

A to return to my Dr this past week as I have been having horrible muscle spasms in my ring and pinky fingers of the PRC hand. After some bending and tapping on the elbow, the surgeon believes there is ulnar nerve irrigation and inflammation. He also thinks the tendon controlling movement o those finger is also inflamed. He started me on muscle relaxes twice a day. If is not improved when I go back in two weeks he will end me for a nerve function test to look for possible nerve damage. I got my new set of measurements this past Monday a 7° improvement one direction and5° the other. There is talking of putting me into a special brace at night that will slowly an gently force my hand to stay in a slight flexed position while I sleep to try to improve the flexation of e wrist downward. Probably this Monday my therapist will have me start not wearing the brace at all unless out in public. Have been til it will probably be another 7-8 weeks before they will begin remove the lifting restriction I’m under. It will also be after the new year before they will consider letting my try taking the dogs back to training. I honestly feel that if the wrist would pop (like your knuckles do) it would feel a lot better and not like something in there is on the verge of breaking lol. This was my end of day 44. Still a long road ahead of me but I’m getting there.

dewgrls.back@gmail.com

Cristy Prior

Mark

Submitted on 2013/11/07 at 1:26 pm

1 November was my 4 month anniversary. I golfed 18 holes that day. Probably the last time I’ll golf until next spring but it was also the first time I golfed a full 18 holes at one time. The wrist held up pretty good. I still have some slight pain on the pinky side of the wrist but it feels like it might have been a little more subdued compared to other times I golfed earlier in the month of Oct. On the days following that, I spent time cleaning up parts of a tree that fell in my yard due to a storm that blew through. I probably worked my left wrist and hand more than I had in the previous 6-8 months. I didn’t feel I needed to protect it much at all. I was able to start a chainsaw pulling with my left hand (A couple months prior I couldn’t get the chain saw started with my left hand). After cleaning up the tree branches, my hand did not feel unusually sore. My left forearm was sore and tight but that went away after a day or two.

In regards to pain/tightness at the base of the thumb in that meaty part of the palm, I kind of invented my own stretch to take some of the edge off the pain/tightness. I don’t know if it will work for anybody else, but here is what I did…
– Close your hand into a fist and make a ‘thumbs up’ sign
– Using your good hand hold the thumb in that position (straight up)
– Open your PRC hand then repeatedly close your PRC hand into a fist by starting with the joints towards the tips of your fingers. When you finish making the fist, the finger tips will be rolled up into the middle of your palm.
– For me it would feel tight in the meaty part of the palm/base of the thumb and I would also feel tightness on the palm side of the index finger.
– After doing this for a couple weeks, I would not feel tightness in these two areas while doing this exercise and even though I still have some soreness at the base of my thumb/palm, it is not as bad as it was before.

In regards to the pain on the pinky side of my wrist, I’m trying a ‘stretch’ to see if I can get rid of that pain. I don’t know if what I am doing is helping or not. I’ve been doing it for less than a week and it seems for wrist pain, it takes a month before I can tell if anything is getting any better. But here is what I’m doing, incase anybody else wants to try it…
– I hold my arm with the PRC wrist (left) staight out in front of me with the palm straigt down.
– Then I rotate my wrist clockwise 90 degrees so that my palm is facing off to my left. This triggers the slight discomfort on the pinky side of my wrist (specifically the discomfort is at the boney little knob that is part of the ulna bone)
-While holding my hand in this position, I lower it down and stick it between the seat cushions of the couch while I’m watching TV.
– Every 5 minutes or so I take my hand out of the seat cushions and rotate the wrist CW and CCW a couple times and then go back to all the way CW and stuff it in the seat cusion. I’ll do this for about a half hour.
– Think it will help with the discomfort on the pinky side of my wrist, but I don’t expect to know for sure until Dec comes around. I don’t think it is an agressive kind of maneuver and so I don’t think I’m doing myself any harm.

1 November was my 4 month anniversary. I golfed 18 holes that day. Probably the last time I’ll golf until next spring but it was also the first time I golfed a full 18 holes at one time. The wrist held up pretty good. I still have some slight pain on the pinky side of the wrist but it feels like it might have been a little more subdued compared to other times I golfed earlier in the month of Oct. On the days following that, I spent time cleaning up parts of a tree that fell in my yard due to a storm that blew through. I probably worked my left wrist and hand more than I had in the previous 6-8 months. I didn’t feel I needed to protect it much at all. I was able to start a chainsaw pulling with my left hand (A couple months prior I couldn’t get the chain saw started with my left hand). After cleaning up the tree branches, my hand did not feel unusually sore. My left forearm was sore and tight but that went away after a day or two. In regards to pain/tightness at the base of the thumb in that meaty part of the palm, I kind of invented my own stretch to take some of the edge off the pain/tightness. I don’t know if it will work for anybody else, but here is what I did… – Close your hand into a fist and make a ‘thumbs up’ sign – Using your good hand hold the thumb in that position (straight up) – Open your PRC hand then repeatedly close your PRC hand into a fist by starting with the joints towards the tips of your fingers. When you finish making the fist, the finger tips will be rolled up into the middle of your palm. – For me it would feel tight in the meaty part of the palm/base of the thumb and I would also feel tightness on the palm side of the index finger. – After doing this for a couple weeks, I would not feel tightness in these two areas while doing this exercise and even though I still have some soreness at the base of my thumb/palm, it is not as bad as it was before. In regards to the pain on the pinky side of my wrist, I’m trying a ‘stretch’ to see if I can get rid of that pain. I don’t know if what I am doing is helping or not. I’ve been doing it for less than a week and it seems for wrist pain, it takes a month before I can tell if anything is getting any better. But here is what I’m doing, incase anybody else wants to try it… – I hold my arm with the PRC wrist (left) staight out in front of me with the palm straigt down. – Then I rotate my wrist clockwise 90 degrees so that my palm is facing off to my left. This triggers the slight discomfort on the pinky side of my wrist (specifically the discomfort is at the boney little knob that is part of the ulna bone) -While holding my hand in this position, I lower it down and stick it between the seat cushions of the couch while I’m watching TV. – Every 5 minutes or so I take my hand out of the seat cushions and rotate the wrist CW and CCW a couple times and then go back to all the way CW and stuff it in the seat cusion. I’ll do this for about a half hour. – Think it will help with the discomfort on the pinky side of my wrist, but I don’t expect to know for sure until Dec comes around. I don’t think it is an agressive kind of maneuver and so I don’t think I’m doing myself any harm.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/11/06 at 6:25 am | In reply to Sandy.

Yes, my thumb is also a problem. I met with the surgeon last week and he explained that when they remove the bones they are in fact re-sculpturing the wrist but never quite know what the end result will be since the bones settle in depending on your muscles and ligaments and how you move. Often he said the bottom of the thumb becomes an issue. He did say that after 6-months that he would suggest a Cortizone shot into the base of the thumb. I asked if this was a temporary solution and he said that often it is a permanent solution and the pain goes away.

I am looking forward to the CT-Scan report that I should receive TODAY!!! I also am scheduled next week for a MRI. I will be posting the reports. My pinky does not have pain but is the only finger that will not fully extend straight at will. It seems to have a mind of its own.

I think for me, counting money would create stiffness in my fingers which is my issue at the moment. It is not so much the pain.

I wish you luck and please keep us informed on your progress.

Yes, my thumb is also a problem. I met with the surgeon last week and he explained that when they remove the bones they are in fact re-sculpturing the wrist but never quite know what the end result will be since the bones settle in depending on your muscles and ligaments and how you move. Often he said the bottom of the thumb becomes an issue. He did say that after 6-months that he would suggest a Cortizone shot into the base of the thumb. I asked if this was a temporary solution and he said that often it is a permanent solution and the pain goes away. I am looking forward to the CT-Scan report that I should receive TODAY!!! I also am scheduled next week for a MRI. I will be posting the reports. My pinky does not have pain but is the only finger that will not fully extend straight at will. It seems to have a mind of its own. I think for me, counting money would create stiffness in my fingers which is my issue at the moment. It is not so much the pain. I wish you luck and please keep us informed on your progress.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Sandy

Submitted on 2013/11/05 at 7:22 pm

It was just on a whim that I even googled PRC and to find this blog is wonderful. I am 3 months post surgery. Was doing wonderfully. Went back to work just 2 weeks ago as a bank teller. Has not been easy, I am actually back in the soft brace as the pain has increased substantially. Particularly with my thumb. I also have pain most days, though minimal, on the pinky side, nice to know that is normal. I am concerned that because of my job duties (counting money) all day, that my thumb will be an issue. Any views on that from anyone else? Sandy

It was just on a whim that I even googled PRC and to find this blog is wonderful. I am 3 months post surgery. Was doing wonderfully. Went back to work just 2 weeks ago as a bank teller. Has not been easy, I am actually back in the soft brace as the pain has increased substantially. Particularly with my thumb. I also have pain most days, though minimal, on the pinky side, nice to know that is normal. I am concerned that because of my job duties (counting money) all day, that my thumb will be an issue. Any views on that from anyone else? Sandy

sandycorbett246@hotmail.com

Sandy

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/11/01 at 11:37 am | In reply to Barbara.

You are right. I do not eat sugar or wheat but the damn chocolates came into the house a few days ago for Halloween and I did have some. Additionally, I was busy and did not have my green smoothie for lunch and we ran out of wheat grass a few days ago. So you are correct. I bet that once I am back on track (today) the swelling will begin to go away.

You are right. I do not eat sugar or wheat but the damn chocolates came into the house a few days ago for Halloween and I did have some. Additionally, I was busy and did not have my green smoothie for lunch and we ran out of wheat grass a few days ago. So you are correct. I bet that once I am back on track (today) the swelling will begin to go away.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Barbara

Submitted on 2013/11/01 at 11:02 am

Peter,

Maybe this will help and maybe it won’t but I think it is worth trying. You say you have swelling in your fingers still after 4 months. Logically thinking, swelling is inflammation and something is causing the inflammation. You need to do something to prevent the inflammation.

And that something is your diet. This may not make sense to you but I know diet is the culprit causing inflammation in the body. I know this because I have carpal tunnel in both hands and my surgeon wanted to do surgery to relieve the carpal tunnel. I said no to surgery.

I talked to my daughter about this subject and she said that inflammation in the body (which causes carpal tunnel, arthritis, asthma and a host of other nasties) is caused by the foods that we eat. The foods that cause inflammation are refined sugar, anything with flour, grains, of all kinds including oatmeal, dairy (all forms), caffeine and meat. One can eat meat just very little per day. Non inflammatory foods are fruits, eggs and vegetables. Please eat eggs from free range chickens.

I honestly did not believe that eating a non inflammatory diet would help my carpal tunnel. Neither did my surgeon but of course he would say that. If he started promoting a non inflammatory diet for carpal tunnel, he would be out of business.

So, to test this theory I cut out all refined sugar, coffee and anything with flour cold turkey 3 weeks ago. I lost 10lbs and my carpal tunnel has been reduced to only slight tingling in the fingers once in a while. Very mild compared to what I had before. When I was working on something before my new diet, I had to stop, drop my hands down for a few minutes and resume the activity and then do it again. Very frustrating.

So, anyone who does not believe that diet causes inflammation that causes a host of ailments, should rethink this. It really works.

Maybe the non inflammatory diet will work for your swelling? If you stop eating the inflammatory foods cold turkey you will experience flu like symptoms and fatigue but that will last only 4 days or so. After that, you will feel great. I recommend cold turkey and not gradual.

Hope this helps.
Barb

Peter, Maybe this will help and maybe it won’t but I think it is worth trying. You say you have swelling in your fingers still after 4 months. Logically thinking, swelling is inflammation and something is causing the inflammation. You need to do something to prevent the inflammation. And that something is your diet. This may not make sense to you but I know diet is the culprit causing inflammation in the body. I know this because I have carpal tunnel in both hands and my surgeon wanted to do surgery to relieve the carpal tunnel. I said no to surgery. I talked to my daughter about this subject and she said that inflammation in the body (which causes carpal tunnel, arthritis, asthma and a host of other nasties) is caused by the foods that we eat. The foods that cause inflammation are refined sugar, anything with flour, grains, of all kinds including oatmeal, dairy (all forms), caffeine and meat. One can eat meat just very little per day. Non inflammatory foods are fruits, eggs and vegetables. Please eat eggs from free range chickens. I honestly did not believe that eating a non inflammatory diet would help my carpal tunnel. Neither did my surgeon but of course he would say that. If he started promoting a non inflammatory diet for carpal tunnel, he would be out of business. So, to test this theory I cut out all refined sugar, coffee and anything with flour cold turkey 3 weeks ago. I lost 10lbs and my carpal tunnel has been reduced to only slight tingling in the fingers once in a while. Very mild compared to what I had before. When I was working on something before my new diet, I had to stop, drop my hands down for a few minutes and resume the activity and then do it again. Very frustrating. So, anyone who does not believe that diet causes inflammation that causes a host of ailments, should rethink this. It really works. Maybe the non inflammatory diet will work for your swelling? If you stop eating the inflammatory foods cold turkey you will experience flu like symptoms and fatigue but that will last only 4 days or so. After that, you will feel great. I recommend cold turkey and not gradual. Hope this helps. Barb

handcrafting456@gmail.com

Barbara

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2013/10/28 at 3:24 pm

I had my first physical therapy session today. It went better than I expected. Am a little sore but not as bad as I thought. The therapist seemed a little impressed with my baseline measurements. I am measuring 25% one action and 15% the other. Still not allowed to lift anything with the hand heavier than a 16oz bottle of soda. I have to use vitamin e oil on the scar several times a day with my exercises. She only gave me 3 to really concentrate on right now.
I was told in this clinic they are able to get 100% back for most of their patients… I’m hoping to be one of those. It’s looking like therapy is 3 times a week for 4 weeks then twice a week for 4 weeks then once a week for another 4 weeks. It’s probably going to be after the new year before I can get my dogs back into training.

I had my first physical therapy session today. It went better than I expected. Am a little sore but not as bad as I thought. The therapist seemed a little impressed with my baseline measurements. I am measuring 25% one action and 15% the other. Still not allowed to lift anything with the hand heavier than a 16oz bottle of soda. I have to use vitamin e oil on the scar several times a day with my exercises. She only gave me 3 to really concentrate on right now. I was told in this clinic they are able to get 100% back for most of their patients… I’m hoping to be one of those. It’s looking like therapy is 3 times a week for 4 weeks then twice a week for 4 weeks then once a week for another 4 weeks. It’s probably going to be after the new year before I can get my dogs back into training.

dewgrls.back@gmail.com

Cristy Prior

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2013/10/28 at 7:06 am | In reply to Mark.

Yes I have been in the removable brace for 2 weeks now. It was scary the first few days out of the cast! I am starting physical therapy this morning. The burning sensation has lessened quite a bit and the brace doesn’t feel as irritating or painful on the skin as it has just a week ago.
I have excellent use of my fingers now that there is almost no swelling in them during the day. Morning after I wake up are still the most painful part of the day. I still ice down a few times a day and it seems to help.
I know I will be getting treatments for edema management and scar management at therapy along with PROM (passive range of motion), heat and ice, ultrasound therapy and a few others I can’t recall off hand. I can’t imagine the scar looking any better than it does now. My surgeon did an amazing job closing things back up!
I keep trying to remind myself this will be a long process but I get impatient still not being able to do somethings for myself.

 

Mark

Mark

Submitted on 2013/10/23 at 4:33 pm | In reply to Cristy Prior.

I suppose you are to the point of being out of your cast and you now wear a removable brace. That was a pretty intimdating time. I didn’t like the thought of moving my wrist during those first couple days after the cast was removed. It just felt weird (besides any pain). The physical therapy really should be like any other physical therapy thay you might have had or that you might have heard of. I’ve heard people with wrist injuries having the physical therapist move their wrist one direction until they cry and then move it in another direction until they cry. The wrist exercises that you will be doing for a PRC are not like that. All your exercises will involve moving your wrist on its own as far as you can without forcing it into any pain. There is no quick fix for a prc wrist. It takes patience and should not be forced. You should be told that if the exercises hurt, then stop. If the wrist hurts too much the next day, cut back on the exercises. This is a marathon….Not a sprint. In regards to the fingers, I personnally was more aggressive in doing those exercises. I treated the wrist with ‘kid gloves’ but I would be more likely to force things with the finger movements and in my case my fingers seemed to respond pretty well to being exercised. I had some weird skin burning sensations on the back of my hand, underneath the skin, but not over the area of the scar. Not sure what that was, but the brace seemed to agravate it. But that slowly subsided. One of the things I was told to do with the scar was to lightly massage the area around it. The intent was to keep the different layers of whatever, that the doctor had to cut through to get to the bone, from sticking together. I was supposed to do that 2 or 3 times a day. By about a week or two prior to my 3 months post op, the watch that I wore was back down to the same size band as I had prior to the surgery.

Finger improvements can sometimes be noticed at weekly intervals, but it has been my experience that wrist improvements are hard to notice over periods less than a month.

I suppose you are to the point of being out of your cast and you now wear a removable brace. That was a pretty intimdating time. I didn’t like the thought of moving my wrist during those first couple days after the cast was removed. It just felt weird (besides any pain). The physical therapy really should be like any other physical therapy thay you might have had or that you might have heard of. I’ve heard people with wrist injuries having the physical therapist move their wrist one direction until they cry and then move it in another direction until they cry. The wrist exercises that you will be doing for a PRC are not like that. All your exercises will involve moving your wrist on its own as far as you can without forcing it into any pain. There is no quick fix for a prc wrist. It takes patience and should not be forced. You should be told that if the exercises hurt, then stop. If the wrist hurts too much the next day, cut back on the exercises. This is a marathon….Not a sprint. In regards to the fingers, I personnally was more aggressive in doing those exercises. I treated the wrist with ‘kid gloves’ but I would be more likely to force things with the finger movements and in my case my fingers seemed to respond pretty well to being exercised. I had some weird skin burning sensations on the back of my hand, underneath the skin, but not over the area of the scar. Not sure what that was, but the brace seemed to agravate it. But that slowly subsided. One of the things I was told to do with the scar was to lightly massage the area around it. The intent was to keep the different layers of whatever, that the doctor had to cut through to get to the bone, from sticking together. I was supposed to do that 2 or 3 times a day. By about a week or two prior to my 3 months post op, the watch that I wore was back down to the same size band as I had prior to the surgery. Finger improvements can sometimes be noticed at weekly intervals, but it has been my experience that wrist improvements are hard to notice over periods less than a month.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

1

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/10/20 at 9:40 am | In reply to Janet.

When you went through the therapy and it was painful, did it result in total swelling of your fingers and wrist each time?

When you went through the therapy and it was painful, did it result in total swelling of your fingers and wrist each time?

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/10/20 at 9:36 am

Hi,

If you look at some of the log entries of the early days after my surgery, I was bummed. Today however, I do not have any pain but am only fighting stiffness, especially in the morning. I think I have an issue with a bone spur or something at the base of my thumb. Other than that, I am almost fully functional. I have a Cat Scan and an MRI scheduled for Nov 1 and Nov 20. I hope to have the news then. However, I do see improvement every day, although very slowly. I continually have to remind myself that “hey, I could not do that last week”.

For example, I cut up carrots and celery and noticed that I had a firm grip on the knife which was not the case last week. I have again mastered ALL of the buttons on my Logitech Master TV/Cable Remote with my right hand alone. I can now shake a person’s hand without forewarning them to be gentle (unless they have gorilla hands, of course). I can fully operate my Sony NEX 6 camera using the right hand fingers to operate the menu system. I can pull things very hard now. My grip went to the 5 Lbs squeezer and I think I am ready for the next level.

I think that my biggest issue is that I work from home and by staying home I catered too much to my hand and focussed on it continuously. I have noticed that when I am out and about, I do not focus on the hand and it just functions better without any issues.

I am certain that as the weeks pass, so will your pain and frustration…

Thanks,

Peter Sanderson

PS I have two Cavaliers King Charles and I can now what both of them and play outside and do agility.

Hi, If you look at some of the log entries of the early days after my surgery, I was bummed. Today however, I do not have any pain but am only fighting stiffness, especially in the morning. I think I have an issue with a bone spur or something at the base of my thumb. Other than that, I am almost fully functional. I have a Cat Scan and an MRI scheduled for Nov 1 and Nov 20. I hope to have the news then. However, I do see improvement every day, although very slowly. I continually have to remind myself that "hey, I could not do that last week". For example, I cut up carrots and celery and noticed that I had a firm grip on the knife which was not the case last week. I have again mastered ALL of the buttons on my Logitech Master TV/Cable Remote with my right hand alone. I can now shake a person’s hand without forewarning them to be gentle (unless they have gorilla hands, of course). I can fully operate my Sony NEX 6 camera using the right hand fingers to operate the menu system. I can pull things very hard now. My grip went to the 5 Lbs squeezer and I think I am ready for the next level. I think that my biggest issue is that I work from home and by staying home I catered too much to my hand and focussed on it continuously. I have noticed that when I am out and about, I do not focus on the hand and it just functions better without any issues. I am certain that as the weeks pass, so will your pain and frustration… Thanks, Peter Sanderson PS I have two Cavaliers King Charles and I can now what both of them and play outside and do agility.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2013/10/20 at 3:26 am

I am just over 3 weeks post op and still having pain issues. I have what I believe to be fairly good ROM in my fingers. I can touch each finger to my thumb but like you Mark I get pain on the pinky side of my hand. The skin on top of my hand is painful, especially over the incision and I guess that will ease over time. I am just beginning to try moving my wrist. I’m worried that it still hurts this much with little use, what’s it going to be like when I start physical therapy. I’m just glad the PRC hand is my left and I am right handed. Today was a this hurts worse than before surgery day and has had me discouraged. It seems I will never see the end of the pain and swelling and this suture line will never dissolve and fall out so the tugging and pulling sensation will go away.
Enjoy you time riding Peter and your golfing Mark, hope to be able to say soon I have enough back I was able to put my golden retrievers back into training and that we are on our way to some dog shows!

I am just over 3 weeks post op and still having pain issues. I have what I believe to be fairly good ROM in my fingers. I can touch each finger to my thumb but like you Mark I get pain on the pinky side of my hand. The skin on top of my hand is painful, especially over the incision and I guess that will ease over time. I am just beginning to try moving my wrist. I’m worried that it still hurts this much with little use, what’s it going to be like when I start physical therapy. I’m just glad the PRC hand is my left and I am right handed. Today was a this hurts worse than before surgery day and has had me discouraged. It seems I will never see the end of the pain and swelling and this suture line will never dissolve and fall out so the tugging and pulling sensation will go away. Enjoy you time riding Peter and your golfing Mark, hope to be able to say soon I have enough back I was able to put my golden retrievers back into training and that we are on our way to some dog shows!

dewgrls.back@gmail.com

Cristy Prior

Janet
proximalrowcarpectony

Submitted on 2013/10/18 at 5:36 pm

I had my right wrist done in 2006 and my left one done in 2010. i am very happy with the results. Now I can move both my wrist without all the pain I had before. I went through lots of therphy with both wrist and sure it was painful but it was better than having them fused and never moving them again. Mush easier wiping after going to the bathroom when your wrist bend. Again not as much when there where good but better than before surgery. i suffered for 4 years with my my right wrist before i had surgery but only 1 year with left wrist. I Pray is for anyone who has to go through this has as much luck as i did.

I had my right wrist done in 2006 and my left one done in 2010. i am very happy with the results. Now I can move both my wrist without all the pain I had before. I went through lots of therphy with both wrist and sure it was painful but it was better than having them fused and never moving them again. Mush easier wiping after going to the bathroom when your wrist bend. Again not as much when there where good but better than before surgery. i suffered for 4 years with my my right wrist before i had surgery but only 1 year with left wrist. I Pray is for anyone who has to go through this has as much luck as i did.

jkfrey49@msn.com

Janet

http://proximalrowcarpectony

Mark

Submitted on 2013/10/14 at 10:10 am

Dan,

Played 9 holes 3 months and 1 week after surgery (right handed). I play right handed and the PRC was on my left hand. I noticed at about 2 months after surgery that I felt no discomfort in my left hand when I swung the club left handed. I actually bought a left handed 3 wood and went out to the range and experimented with hitting the ball left handed at about 2 months 1 week from surgery. I didn’t hit the ball very well left handed but I was swinging the club. So based on my experiences, the 4 months is a reasonable expectation. Depending on what hand you had the PRC and whether you play right or left handed, you could be out on the course sooner.

Dan, Played 9 holes 3 months and 1 week after surgery (right handed). I play right handed and the PRC was on my left hand. I noticed at about 2 months after surgery that I felt no discomfort in my left hand when I swung the club left handed. I actually bought a left handed 3 wood and went out to the range and experimented with hitting the ball left handed at about 2 months 1 week from surgery. I didn’t hit the ball very well left handed but I was swinging the club. So based on my experiences, the 4 months is a reasonable expectation. Depending on what hand you had the PRC and whether you play right or left handed, you could be out on the course sooner.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

Dan

Submitted on 2013/10/11 at 4:00 pm | In reply to Mark.

Mark,

How long after surgery did you first play golf? I am just three weeks post but hoping to be back on the links in four months. Does that sound realistic to you given your experience?

Mark, How long after surgery did you first play golf? I am just three weeks post but hoping to be back on the links in four months. Does that sound realistic to you given your experience?

daniel.odonnell@dechert.com

Dan

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2013/10/11 at 8:37 am | In reply to Mark.

Hi,

Now that the swelling has subsided, my fingers are improving quickly. My strength is much better and I believe that in my case (33% of the Cases) my body takes more time to heal and does not like surgery. I no longer take any pain meds and in one month I can now squeeze 8 Lbs on the hand squeezer versus 1.5 Lbs a month ago. I can use dental floss and manipulate it, I can type and best of all I can ride. My major concern is the base of my thumb which is the pictures you saw. The “L” shape between the thumb and index finger. I can only open it half way at the moment. Very Stiff.

The MRI is because the surgeon did not recommend it but my doctor did. So I am prioritized. However, if I wanted to pay $ 500.00 I could have it in 24 Hours. My doctor scheduled a Cat Scan in a week as well. I think that it will only show that I will take longer to heal. Some people have sent me e-mails saying that after being in a cast for 6 weeks from a fractured wrist that it took 1 1/2 years for the stiffness to leave their fingers. I am disappointed that I am in this group, but I am re-assured when I see small progress always in the right direction. Obviously my wrist movement is and will be far less than the 33% success group. But I do not have the pain like the 33% failure group. So, in the middle is better than in the pain group.

I know that I could swing a golf club and be as good as I was before the operation (I was not a golfer).

Thanks, ________________________

Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com

Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________

Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

Hi, Now that the swelling has subsided, my fingers are improving quickly. My strength is much better and I believe that in my case (33% of the Cases) my body takes more time to heal and does not like surgery. I no longer take any pain meds and in one month I can now squeeze 8 Lbs on the hand squeezer versus 1.5 Lbs a month ago. I can use dental floss and manipulate it, I can type and best of all I can ride. My major concern is the base of my thumb which is the pictures you saw. The "L" shape between the thumb and index finger. I can only open it half way at the moment. Very Stiff. The MRI is because the surgeon did not recommend it but my doctor did. So I am prioritized. However, if I wanted to pay $ 500.00 I could have it in 24 Hours. My doctor scheduled a Cat Scan in a week as well. I think that it will only show that I will take longer to heal. Some people have sent me e-mails saying that after being in a cast for 6 weeks from a fractured wrist that it took 1 1/2 years for the stiffness to leave their fingers. I am disappointed that I am in this group, but I am re-assured when I see small progress always in the right direction. Obviously my wrist movement is and will be far less than the 33% success group. But I do not have the pain like the 33% failure group. So, in the middle is better than in the pain group. I know that I could swing a golf club and be as good as I was before the operation (I was not a golfer). Thanks, ________________________ Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________ Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Mark

Submitted on 2013/10/10 at 11:06 am

Good for you in regards to taking your vespa out for a spin. I am a bit stunned by the limited range of motion for the fingers on your right hand at this stage of the game (looked at the pictures on your other blog). Admittedly, I only have my own experiences to draw apon in making any judgement. The range of motion on the fingers on my prc hand is the same or slightly better (becasue of the finger excercises I was doing with the PRC hand) than my good hand. My thumb bothers me most, but not so much in normal motions. It is more of a problem when I have my wrist positioned at the edges of its range of motion. I’m also a little stunned at how long it takes for you to get an MRI. Down here, if a DR prescribes an MRI, it can usually be done within the week. Even some of the smaller orthopedic clinics have on sight MRI equipment. Maybe an MRI will not show anything in your case, but I still think it is a good idea. I think that you need to press for getting more functional use out of your fingers or get a reasonable explaination for why you can’t get more functional use out of your fingers.

I have now golfed 9 holes twice in the last two weeks. I do get some pain on the pinky side of my wrist at some point around impact with the ball. After a few holes, it also gets sensitive to the touch in that area. But a couple hours after I’m done, as a whole, my wrist goes back to feeling normal (at least what I call normal this week). And the next day, it doesn’ t seem any worse for wear. Whether that pain on the pinky side of my wrist will always be there or if it is something that will eventually be excercised out, only time will tell. When hitting my irons, I end up adding about two clubs and still don’t get the ball as far as I could before my wrist went bad. I assume I’ll get some of that distance back. But I was never a big hitter anyway.

Good Luck

Good for you in regards to taking your vespa out for a spin. I am a bit stunned by the limited range of motion for the fingers on your right hand at this stage of the game (looked at the pictures on your other blog). Admittedly, I only have my own experiences to draw apon in making any judgement. The range of motion on the fingers on my prc hand is the same or slightly better (becasue of the finger excercises I was doing with the PRC hand) than my good hand. My thumb bothers me most, but not so much in normal motions. It is more of a problem when I have my wrist positioned at the edges of its range of motion. I’m also a little stunned at how long it takes for you to get an MRI. Down here, if a DR prescribes an MRI, it can usually be done within the week. Even some of the smaller orthopedic clinics have on sight MRI equipment. Maybe an MRI will not show anything in your case, but I still think it is a good idea. I think that you need to press for getting more functional use out of your fingers or get a reasonable explaination for why you can’t get more functional use out of your fingers. I have now golfed 9 holes twice in the last two weeks. I do get some pain on the pinky side of my wrist at some point around impact with the ball. After a few holes, it also gets sensitive to the touch in that area. But a couple hours after I’m done, as a whole, my wrist goes back to feeling normal (at least what I call normal this week). And the next day, it doesn’ t seem any worse for wear. Whether that pain on the pinky side of my wrist will always be there or if it is something that will eventually be excercised out, only time will tell. When hitting my irons, I end up adding about two clubs and still don’t get the ball as far as I could before my wrist went bad. I assume I’ll get some of that distance back. But I was never a big hitter anyway. Good Luck

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2013/10/07 at 11:32 pm

It is the end of day 11 post op and tonight I am having a burning type pain on the top of my Han right above the knuckles that are under the bandwagon. The middle knuckle is still quite tender. I woke with some mild swelling in the wrist this morning as the soft casting material felt tighter than it was the day before. Keeping it elevated all day seems to have fixed it. Guess I did too much with the new puppy yesterday, lesson learned!! I am so glad I go back for my follow up Thursday, I am so ready to scratch all the itches on my arm!

It is the end of day 11 post op and tonight I am having a burning type pain on the top of my Han right above the knuckles that are under the bandwagon. The middle knuckle is still quite tender. I woke with some mild swelling in the wrist this morning as the soft casting material felt tighter than it was the day before. Keeping it elevated all day seems to have fixed it. Guess I did too much with the new puppy yesterday, lesson learned!! I am so glad I go back for my follow up Thursday, I am so ready to scratch all the itches on my arm!

dewgrls.back@gmail.com

Cristy Prior

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/10/04 at 8:20 am | In reply to Cristy Prior.

I think the fact that you have finger movement is great! I think that you will not have the issues that I had with my fingers. However I had only one half cast that was put on when I was under after the surgery. It stayed on for 2 1/2 weeks then removed for a brace. The wrist did not hurt after the two weeks. It felt very weak and absolutely needed 100 % support/ I had to hold my hand up when putting on the brace. It was my fingers that were the issue, specifically my thumb.

Thanks, ________________________

Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com

Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________

Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

I think the fact that you have finger movement is great! I think that you will not have the issues that I had with my fingers. However I had only one half cast that was put on when I was under after the surgery. It stayed on for 2 1/2 weeks then removed for a brace. The wrist did not hurt after the two weeks. It felt very weak and absolutely needed 100 % support/ I had to hold my hand up when putting on the brace. It was my fingers that were the issue, specifically my thumb. Thanks, ________________________ Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________ Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2013/10/04 at 2:58 am

I’ve made it through week one post op! I am down to taking pain meds in the morning after I wake up and before bed. Not quite sure why but the wrist is painful when I first wake up. The gorilla knuckles are gone!!! Such a simple thing but I am glad to have normal looking fingers sticking out of the end of this monstrous soft cast.
I can now move the fingers of the left hand freely, there is some discomfort at times and I take that as my cue to stop for now. Most of the thumb is bandaged into the soft cast so I have no idea what motion I have there. I am still sleeping a lot although since surgery I have not slept through the night. That is the next milestone I am hoping to meet.
I think my biggest worry now is having the soft cast removed and having serious pain in the wrist as they manipulate things while putting the fiberglass cast on. I don’t want to experience pain anywhere near like what I had the first few days after surgery again.
Will try to update you again once the new cast is on, I am sure you are getting tired of my ramblings on here every few days.

I’ve made it through week one post op! I am down to taking pain meds in the morning after I wake up and before bed. Not quite sure why but the wrist is painful when I first wake up. The gorilla knuckles are gone!!! Such a simple thing but I am glad to have normal looking fingers sticking out of the end of this monstrous soft cast. I can now move the fingers of the left hand freely, there is some discomfort at times and I take that as my cue to stop for now. Most of the thumb is bandaged into the soft cast so I have no idea what motion I have there. I am still sleeping a lot although since surgery I have not slept through the night. That is the next milestone I am hoping to meet. I think my biggest worry now is having the soft cast removed and having serious pain in the wrist as they manipulate things while putting the fiberglass cast on. I don’t want to experience pain anywhere near like what I had the first few days after surgery again. Will try to update you again once the new cast is on, I am sure you are getting tired of my ramblings on here every few days.

dewgrls_back@gmail.com

Cristy Prior

Mark

Submitted on 2013/10/01 at 9:46 am

Today makes it 3 months since my surgery. Around a month ago, I was visiting an orthopedic doctor concerning my foot (he is the same doctor that I had originally seen about my wrist and when the MRI showed the schapoid dead and ligament missing he refered me to the hand surgeon) and he asked me about my wrist. Specifically he asked if my wrist felt better now compared to how it felt before the surgery. That struck me as an odd question to be asked only having had the surgery 2 months prior. My answer was that it was all different…it wasn’t an apples to apples comparison. The fact that he asked me the question only 2 months after the surgery made me wonder just how much he knew (or didn’t now) about PRCs and the recovery process. And at the same time, I had to admit to myself that I was not better off after the PRC compared to prior to the surgery. Prior to the surgery, my wrist hurt and was restricting me from doing things but I could still muscle out a full range of motion if I cared to. But I also knew that without surgery, my wrist was only going to be getting worse.

Now at the 3 month point, I think I can say that my wrist is better than it was prior to the surgery. I have the decreased range of motion and I’m learning to deal with that. But I am having short periods (very short periods) of time where I’m doing stuff with my hands and I forget that I have a surgically altered wrist. I’m doing things now with my left hand that definitely caused me more problems prior to the surgery. I went bicyclling this weekend, which might not sound like a ‘wrist’ kind of thing but I was leaning forward on the handle bars for about 1.5 hours. I have to position my left hand a little different to get the angles right. I didn’t wear a brace, but I taped up my wrist. I haven’t gone golfing yet, but I’m swinging a golf club in the back yard and there is very little discomfort and most of the discomfort seems to be along the thumb. Mentally, that doesn’t bother me as much as discomfort in the wrist. If I swing the club left handed, I don’t have any discomfort in my left wrist. So, right now I have made it a goal to try and develop a left handed golf swing over the next 2 years (I find that I can reach an acceptable level of mediocrity in most things I try to do). I think the only reason I have for that is to take some of the stress off my left wrist while golfing and decrease the chances of eventually having a fused wrist at some point in the future. At some point in the next 2 weeks, I’m going to go out and play an actual round of golf (swinging right handed).

My next follow up appointment with the surgeon is in 6 months. The last time I went to physical thereapy was a month ago. I don’t follow any strict exercise regimen. I test out my range of motion and see where the bounderies are in regards to discomfort. My range of motion when I make a fist has been greater than when I have my hand open. I have been working on getting the same range of motion with an open hand as I do with closed fist. And they are about the same now. During that process, I noticed that when my hand is open and I rotate it back I have some tightness at the base of my palm (that meaty part by the thumb). Not sure what that is about but I do try to excersie that out. It has improved some, but still has some room for improvement. I wonder if that is the result of some type of atrophy. During the day, my fingers and finger joints feel fine, but when I wake up in the morning, they are a little stiff. I open and close my hand a couple times and that stiffness goes away. I’m hoping that over the next couple months, my left wrist gets to the point where I don’t really think about it at all.

Today makes it 3 months since my surgery. Around a month ago, I was visiting an orthopedic doctor concerning my foot (he is the same doctor that I had originally seen about my wrist and when the MRI showed the schapoid dead and ligament missing he refered me to the hand surgeon) and he asked me about my wrist. Specifically he asked if my wrist felt better now compared to how it felt before the surgery. That struck me as an odd question to be asked only having had the surgery 2 months prior. My answer was that it was all different…it wasn’t an apples to apples comparison. The fact that he asked me the question only 2 months after the surgery made me wonder just how much he knew (or didn’t now) about PRCs and the recovery process. And at the same time, I had to admit to myself that I was not better off after the PRC compared to prior to the surgery. Prior to the surgery, my wrist hurt and was restricting me from doing things but I could still muscle out a full range of motion if I cared to. But I also knew that without surgery, my wrist was only going to be getting worse. Now at the 3 month point, I think I can say that my wrist is better than it was prior to the surgery. I have the decreased range of motion and I’m learning to deal with that. But I am having short periods (very short periods) of time where I’m doing stuff with my hands and I forget that I have a surgically altered wrist. I’m doing things now with my left hand that definitely caused me more problems prior to the surgery. I went bicyclling this weekend, which might not sound like a ‘wrist’ kind of thing but I was leaning forward on the handle bars for about 1.5 hours. I have to position my left hand a little different to get the angles right. I didn’t wear a brace, but I taped up my wrist. I haven’t gone golfing yet, but I’m swinging a golf club in the back yard and there is very little discomfort and most of the discomfort seems to be along the thumb. Mentally, that doesn’t bother me as much as discomfort in the wrist. If I swing the club left handed, I don’t have any discomfort in my left wrist. So, right now I have made it a goal to try and develop a left handed golf swing over the next 2 years (I find that I can reach an acceptable level of mediocrity in most things I try to do). I think the only reason I have for that is to take some of the stress off my left wrist while golfing and decrease the chances of eventually having a fused wrist at some point in the future. At some point in the next 2 weeks, I’m going to go out and play an actual round of golf (swinging right handed). My next follow up appointment with the surgeon is in 6 months. The last time I went to physical thereapy was a month ago. I don’t follow any strict exercise regimen. I test out my range of motion and see where the bounderies are in regards to discomfort. My range of motion when I make a fist has been greater than when I have my hand open. I have been working on getting the same range of motion with an open hand as I do with closed fist. And they are about the same now. During that process, I noticed that when my hand is open and I rotate it back I have some tightness at the base of my palm (that meaty part by the thumb). Not sure what that is about but I do try to excersie that out. It has improved some, but still has some room for improvement. I wonder if that is the result of some type of atrophy. During the day, my fingers and finger joints feel fine, but when I wake up in the morning, they are a little stiff. I open and close my hand a couple times and that stiffness goes away. I’m hoping that over the next couple months, my left wrist gets to the point where I don’t really think about it at all.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/09/30 at 9:09 am | In reply to Cristy Prior.

I think everyone is different and you do your exercises and physiotherapy until you fell that you have reached a level of satisfaction. I still do my exercises because after the swelling goes, I got stiffness. I heard that you can get this in your fingers after many different types of surgery including rotator cuff. It is now 4 months after surgery and I can do many things and do not have much pain except for the stiffness and soreness in my fingers from exercising. I am very stiff when I wake up and then after stretching and working them (20 minutes) they seem to work. In fact, it is 1-hour after I am awake and I am typing this to you using my fingers (or as many as I used prior to the surgery).

I can now wash dishes (although not my favorite thing), wash my hair (all 0.2 cm of it), cook, shift gears in my Fiat Abarth (very important) but the most important thing for me I can still not do. I do not have the grip strength to ride my motorcycle and use the front brakes. I seem to have an issue with my thumb that is stiff and still a bit swollen. I am scheduled for an MRI to follow-up and see exactly what is happening.

As for sleeping, here is what worked for me (right hand surgery). I put one pillow next to me on the right side smushed up then another pillow angled on that pillow to make a 45 degree angle so that my hand would be higher than my heart (drain the swelling). Additionally I put a pillow propped up the right side leaning against the back board also at about a 45 degree angle. This way I could move my arm to be propped up from leaning frontwards and then backwards just so that it is different and there is some movement that works. I am not a back sleeper so that took much time to get used to. Luckily I had a new I-Comfort foam mattress and I believe this was very helpful, especially for back sleeping.

My surgeon stressed that after the cast is off to keep your hand up as much as possible. This will start to hurt your shoulders. If you have insurance, get ready to have some massages once or twice a week for your shoulder to relieve the knots.

Keep an eye on the cast and go back if you think it is too tight. Also, please check back periodically and let us know your progress.

I think everyone is different and you do your exercises and physiotherapy until you fell that you have reached a level of satisfaction. I still do my exercises because after the swelling goes, I got stiffness. I heard that you can get this in your fingers after many different types of surgery including rotator cuff. It is now 4 months after surgery and I can do many things and do not have much pain except for the stiffness and soreness in my fingers from exercising. I am very stiff when I wake up and then after stretching and working them (20 minutes) they seem to work. In fact, it is 1-hour after I am awake and I am typing this to you using my fingers (or as many as I used prior to the surgery). I can now wash dishes (although not my favorite thing), wash my hair (all 0.2 cm of it), cook, shift gears in my Fiat Abarth (very important) but the most important thing for me I can still not do. I do not have the grip strength to ride my motorcycle and use the front brakes. I seem to have an issue with my thumb that is stiff and still a bit swollen. I am scheduled for an MRI to follow-up and see exactly what is happening. As for sleeping, here is what worked for me (right hand surgery). I put one pillow next to me on the right side smushed up then another pillow angled on that pillow to make a 45 degree angle so that my hand would be higher than my heart (drain the swelling). Additionally I put a pillow propped up the right side leaning against the back board also at about a 45 degree angle. This way I could move my arm to be propped up from leaning frontwards and then backwards just so that it is different and there is some movement that works. I am not a back sleeper so that took much time to get used to. Luckily I had a new I-Comfort foam mattress and I believe this was very helpful, especially for back sleeping. My surgeon stressed that after the cast is off to keep your hand up as much as possible. This will start to hurt your shoulders. If you have insurance, get ready to have some massages once or twice a week for your shoulder to relieve the knots. Keep an eye on the cast and go back if you think it is too tight. Also, please check back periodically and let us know your progress.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2013/09/30 at 2:32 am

I asked for my bones as well… I didn’t get them. Your surgeon was cool in that he at least showed them to you! I’m jealous lol

I asked for my bones as well… I didn’t get them. Your surgeon was cool in that he at least showed them to you! I’m jealous lol

dewgrls_back@gmail.com

Cristy Prior

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2013/09/30 at 2:26 am

I am now starting day 4 after my PRC. The pain from the surgery is well under control but the swelling is driving me insane! I feel like my fingers are about to burst. The soft cast they have me in for now isn’t too tight and blood flow to finger tips is fine. I know swelling is to be expected but I didn’t think I would have what we are affectionately calling gorilla knuckles lol.
I go back to the surgeon on day 14 to have the hard cast put on and will be in that for 3 weeks. No stitches to be removed as he used dissolving sutures.
I can’t belie how difficult it is to find a comfortable sleeping position right now. I hate this being basically helpless and am ready to get back to my life of taking care of hubby and training my dogs.
I know it will come in time and hubby is very supportive in helping me with pretty much everything from washing the dishes to helping me wash my hair. I would be happier if I could use my fingers I think.
How long did you or are you still doing physical therapy and how often do/did you go? I try to at least wiggle my fingers around a few times a day right now.
Oh the doc said the bone that had the cyst in it was pretty soft… I guess a soft bone is a bad thing so we made the right decisions to have this surgery.

I am now starting day 4 after my PRC. The pain from the surgery is well under control but the swelling is driving me insane! I feel like my fingers are about to burst. The soft cast they have me in for now isn’t too tight and blood flow to finger tips is fine. I know swelling is to be expected but I didn’t think I would have what we are affectionately calling gorilla knuckles lol. I go back to the surgeon on day 14 to have the hard cast put on and will be in that for 3 weeks. No stitches to be removed as he used dissolving sutures. I can’t belie how difficult it is to find a comfortable sleeping position right now. I hate this being basically helpless and am ready to get back to my life of taking care of hubby and training my dogs. I know it will come in time and hubby is very supportive in helping me with pretty much everything from washing the dishes to helping me wash my hair. I would be happier if I could use my fingers I think. How long did you or are you still doing physical therapy and how often do/did you go? I try to at least wiggle my fingers around a few times a day right now. Oh the doc said the bone that had the cyst in it was pretty soft… I guess a soft bone is a bad thing so we made the right decisions to have this surgery.

dewgrls_back@gmail.com

Cristy Prior

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2013/09/09 at 2:14 pm | In reply to Cristy Prior.

I’ve learned one thing after having a PRC. That is everybody is different. The reason they are having the PRC, surgical approach, and how the body reacts to surgery is all different. I’m not a Doctor and I can only tell you what has happened to me. I had something similar and actually fractured my lunate bone which caused me to have the PRC. It is now 2 1/2 months after my surgery and I’m doing most things with my wrist. Obviously it does not have the same range of motion since it is basically converting complex joint into a hinge. I still have issues with my fingers that are stiff which means my strength in gripping things is much weaker than before. I am told this will take time and exercise to regain. In my case my goal is to ride my motorcycle again and I tried it yesterday. I was able to manage the throttle sufficiently well but it didn’t mean leveraging my arm a bit up and down. However because of my weak grip strength, I did not feel safe with the front brakes. In my case the first month and a half was the worst and I had problems with my fingers. If you read many of the comments on this blog you will find that that is not always the case and that in some cases people are up and using their fingers within a week or two. Given your particular situation and what you have explained, I guess you have no choice but to have a PRC. One reader put it quite accurately: “you do not choose the PRC, the PRC chooses you”.

I will soon have a section with questions and answers and my Doctor who runs a teaching hospital has agreed to answer some of them every week. Of course they will not be able to answer diagnostic questions that only general questions about a PRC. Check back in a week…

I wish you good luck and I hope that you are in the top 30% that has no or little pain or recovery issues.

I’ve learned one thing after having a PRC. That is everybody is different. The reason they are having the PRC, surgical approach, and how the body reacts to surgery is all different. I’m not a Doctor and I can only tell you what has happened to me. I had something similar and actually fractured my lunate bone which caused me to have the PRC. It is now 2 1/2 months after my surgery and I’m doing most things with my wrist. Obviously it does not have the same range of motion since it is basically converting complex joint into a hinge. I still have issues with my fingers that are stiff which means my strength in gripping things is much weaker than before. I am told this will take time and exercise to regain. In my case my goal is to ride my motorcycle again and I tried it yesterday. I was able to manage the throttle sufficiently well but it didn’t mean leveraging my arm a bit up and down. However because of my weak grip strength, I did not feel safe with the front brakes. In my case the first month and a half was the worst and I had problems with my fingers. If you read many of the comments on this blog you will find that that is not always the case and that in some cases people are up and using their fingers within a week or two. Given your particular situation and what you have explained, I guess you have no choice but to have a PRC. One reader put it quite accurately: "you do not choose the PRC, the PRC chooses you". I will soon have a section with questions and answers and my Doctor who runs a teaching hospital has agreed to answer some of them every week. Of course they will not be able to answer diagnostic questions that only general questions about a PRC. Check back in a week… I wish you good luck and I hope that you are in the top 30% that has no or little pain or recovery issues.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Cristy Prior

Submitted on 2013/09/09 at 11:17 am

I am facing PRC in about 16 days. Roughly 16 years ago I broke my Scaphiod bone and was in a cast for 3 months. We thought everything healed fine until I started having pain in the left wrist again. X-rays showed no new fractures so I was sent for a bone scan. They found a cyst in the Lunate bone but were unable to determine if it was a simple bone cyst or a degenerative bone cyst. So off and on over the next several years I would go in and be put in a cast for 2 weeks of forced rest when it would act up and cause pain and loss of function of the hand and wrist.
It is now to the point the pain is almost constant and new MRI imaging shows the cyst has gown quite large. I was sent to see an orthopedic hand surgeon. He informed me that it is in fact a degenerative cyst in the Lunate bone located right next to the bone wall.
I was given 3 options. 2 of which he said would probably not have a high success rate with where the cyst is located in the bone. He could not guarantee I would not be back to see him in 6 months with the same problems with the fusion or the treatment with a heated probe inserted into the bone.
He told me what most likely happened is when I fractured my Scaphoid, I probably had damaged the ligament located between the Schapoid and Lunate bone which in turn somehow managed to cause this cyst to develop. I was told PRC was my best option to relieve the pain and to salvage most of my wrist function.. without this surgery I would be looking at one day losing all hand function when the Lunate bone finally shattered due to the cyst breaking thru the bone wall.

I have a general idea of what to expect but am unsure of exactly how long I will not be allowed to use my hand or wrist at all after the surgery.

I am facing PRC in about 16 days. Roughly 16 years ago I broke my Scaphiod bone and was in a cast for 3 months. We thought everything healed fine until I started having pain in the left wrist again. X-rays showed no new fractures so I was sent for a bone scan. They found a cyst in the Lunate bone but were unable to determine if it was a simple bone cyst or a degenerative bone cyst. So off and on over the next several years I would go in and be put in a cast for 2 weeks of forced rest when it would act up and cause pain and loss of function of the hand and wrist. It is now to the point the pain is almost constant and new MRI imaging shows the cyst has gown quite large. I was sent to see an orthopedic hand surgeon. He informed me that it is in fact a degenerative cyst in the Lunate bone located right next to the bone wall. I was given 3 options. 2 of which he said would probably not have a high success rate with where the cyst is located in the bone. He could not guarantee I would not be back to see him in 6 months with the same problems with the fusion or the treatment with a heated probe inserted into the bone. He told me what most likely happened is when I fractured my Scaphoid, I probably had damaged the ligament located between the Schapoid and Lunate bone which in turn somehow managed to cause this cyst to develop. I was told PRC was my best option to relieve the pain and to salvage most of my wrist function.. without this surgery I would be looking at one day losing all hand function when the Lunate bone finally shattered due to the cyst breaking thru the bone wall. I have a general idea of what to expect but am unsure of exactly how long I will not be allowed to use my hand or wrist at all after the surgery.

dewgrls.back@gmail.com

Cristy Prior

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/09/04 at 8:49 am | In reply to Mark.

Hi,

Actually here it is free if I want to wait a month but I can go to a semi-private clinic and get it done in 24 hours for $ 725.00

Thanks, ________________________

Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com

Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________

Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

Hi, Actually here it is free if I want to wait a month but I can go to a semi-private clinic and get it done in 24 hours for $ 725.00 Thanks, ________________________ Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________ Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Mark

Submitted on 2013/09/04 at 8:47 am

Good luck getting an MRI if that is what you choose to do. Down here, it seems doctors are spring loaded to wanting to have an MRI done. My first reaction to a doctor recommending an MRI was ‘is that really necessary’, but I’m gradually becoming a believer in them. There is so much more information there, compared to an xray. And a whole lot more expensive, compared to an xray.

, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2013/09/03 at 10:32 am | In reply to Mark.

Update- Just called New York and they require an order from a doctor as well. So I guess I will discuss it with my doctor.

Thanks, ________________________

Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com

Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________

Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

Update- Just called New York and they require an order from a doctor as well. So I guess I will discuss it with my doctor. Thanks, ________________________ Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________ Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

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Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

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Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2013/09/03 at 10:27 am | In reply to Mark.

Hi,

The MRI is a Canadian thing. If there is no reason to have an MRI, then it is impossible to get one. If the doctor or any doctor orders one, then you would receive one. However, the swollen fingers seem to be something that does happen in 30-40 % of the PRC and is dependent on many factors. My swelling is going down slowly. I spoke with someone who fractured their wrist and still has a bit of swelling after two years. They told me that they had the swelling for the first year. Therefore, my doctor seems to feel that it is not the expected result but also not so unusual to warrant further investigation at this time. But, I agree with your comment and will gladly pay (in the US) for an MRI just to see what the information says.

Thanks, ________________________

Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com

Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________

Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

Hi, The MRI is a Canadian thing. If there is no reason to have an MRI, then it is impossible to get one. If the doctor or any doctor orders one, then you would receive one. However, the swollen fingers seem to be something that does happen in 30-40 % of the PRC and is dependent on many factors. My swelling is going down slowly. I spoke with someone who fractured their wrist and still has a bit of swelling after two years. They told me that they had the swelling for the first year. Therefore, my doctor seems to feel that it is not the expected result but also not so unusual to warrant further investigation at this time. But, I agree with your comment and will gladly pay (in the US) for an MRI just to see what the information says. Thanks, ________________________ Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________ Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Mark

Submitted on 2013/09/03 at 9:48 am

I think getting the MRI would be a good idea. Not sure why you would have to go across the border for an MRI. Is that a function of the Canadian Health Care system or is that the closest MRI equipment. Maybe you have some kind of vascular issue that is not allowing blood to be moved out of your hand and it is just collecting there. But it would seem to me that you have shown enough patience with the swelling in your fingers and it is time to find a cause and to not assume at this point that it will work itself out. Maybe a new set of eyes looking at your wrist/hand would be good. Even though I had/have finger discomfort, my fingers were never swollen during this whole process. Other than a hard bump where the incision was made, I don’t have any visible swelling in the wrist.

Last week I had my last meeting with the therapist. Obviously I’m not done, but I can do excersices myself at home. During that last meeting, they had me use a ‘wrist roller’ (2-3 lb weaight at the end of a rope with the other end of the rope attached to a handle and I have to raise and lower the weight by coiling the rope around the handle…that’s harder to describe using words that I thought it woudl be) for the first time. I think that will be a good excersice for working out the remaining bugs in the wrist. They also had me use a ‘velcro board’ where velcro was attached to a board about 12-18 inches long and then I had a roller about the size of a lint roller with the other type of velcro material attached to the cylinder. I had to move the roller towards me and away from me by moving my wrist similiar to moving the throttle on a motorcycle. The velcro acted as the resistence.

Nobody has told me whether I should wear a brace at night (or not) but I choose to wear one. At this point prefer my wrist to be ‘under control’ when I’m sleeping. I’m doing some light swinging of a golf club in the back yard. I also bought a left handed golf club and I’m trying to get a feel for how practical it would be to switch to golfing left handed. At this point in time, the stresses on my left wrist are much less when I swing the club left handed. Who knows, maybe switching to golfing left handed could be a better long term solution. I’m also doing some push ups with push up bars that keep my hands off the floor. For right now I keep my knees on the floor to minimize the amount of weight on my wrist.

I’m only two months out from the surgery. What little there is to read about PRCs and from what my therapist says, the 3 month point is really were things start coming together and I’ll get a feel for what kind of wrist I will have. So I’m trying to show some patience and find a balance between probing to find out what my wrist can do now and still letting it have it’s space and let it continue to firm up over the next month.

And another thing, when my therapist measures range of motion he does it when I make a fist. I have about 45 degrees forward and about 35-40 degrees back. If I straighten my fingers, the forword motion is mostly the same (a little less) but I lose almost all of my backwards range of motion. It is my understanding that is due to the slack in the tendons due to the row of bones coming out. I assume, for comparison’s sake, that making the measurements with a closed fist is some kind of ‘standard’. But I guess I don’t know that for sure. When you give your measurements, you don’t say whether you have a fist or your hand is open. I assume that your measurements are with your hand open.

I think getting the MRI would be a good idea. Not sure why you would have to go across the border for an MRI. Is that a function of the Canadian Health Care system or is that the closest MRI equipment. Maybe you have some kind of vascular issue that is not allowing blood to be moved out of your hand and it is just collecting there. But it would seem to me that you have shown enough patience with the swelling in your fingers and it is time to find a cause and to not assume at this point that it will work itself out. Maybe a new set of eyes looking at your wrist/hand would be good. Even though I had/have finger discomfort, my fingers were never swollen during this whole process. Other than a hard bump where the incision was made, I don’t have any visible swelling in the wrist. Last week I had my last meeting with the therapist. Obviously I’m not done, but I can do excersices myself at home. During that last meeting, they had me use a ‘wrist roller’ (2-3 lb weaight at the end of a rope with the other end of the rope attached to a handle and I have to raise and lower the weight by coiling the rope around the handle…that’s harder to describe using words that I thought it woudl be) for the first time. I think that will be a good excersice for working out the remaining bugs in the wrist. They also had me use a ‘velcro board’ where velcro was attached to a board about 12-18 inches long and then I had a roller about the size of a lint roller with the other type of velcro material attached to the cylinder. I had to move the roller towards me and away from me by moving my wrist similiar to moving the throttle on a motorcycle. The velcro acted as the resistence. Nobody has told me whether I should wear a brace at night (or not) but I choose to wear one. At this point prefer my wrist to be ‘under control’ when I’m sleeping. I’m doing some light swinging of a golf club in the back yard. I also bought a left handed golf club and I’m trying to get a feel for how practical it would be to switch to golfing left handed. At this point in time, the stresses on my left wrist are much less when I swing the club left handed. Who knows, maybe switching to golfing left handed could be a better long term solution. I’m also doing some push ups with push up bars that keep my hands off the floor. For right now I keep my knees on the floor to minimize the amount of weight on my wrist. I’m only two months out from the surgery. What little there is to read about PRCs and from what my therapist says, the 3 month point is really were things start coming together and I’ll get a feel for what kind of wrist I will have. So I’m trying to show some patience and find a balance between probing to find out what my wrist can do now and still letting it have it’s space and let it continue to firm up over the next month. And another thing, when my therapist measures range of motion he does it when I make a fist. I have about 45 degrees forward and about 35-40 degrees back. If I straighten my fingers, the forword motion is mostly the same (a little less) but I lose almost all of my backwards range of motion. It is my understanding that is due to the slack in the tendons due to the row of bones coming out. I assume, for comparison’s sake, that making the measurements with a closed fist is some kind of ‘standard’. But I guess I don’t know that for sure. When you give your measurements, you don’t say whether you have a fist or your hand is open. I assume that your measurements are with your hand open.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

Joann

Submitted on 2013/08/23 at 11:13 am

I was in surgery for one and half hours also. My wrist will not move inward at all, moving up and down is a struggle and painful. My index finger has the most problems. I just came from therapy, they wanted me to use chinese balls (2) and move them in my hand.. that was impossible to do. That would be great if you can ask you doctors some questions. I dont get anywhere asking my questions to therapy and my doctor. It seems like they dance around the questions.

I was in surgery for one and half hours also. My wrist will not move inward at all, moving up and down is a struggle and painful. My index finger has the most problems. I just came from therapy, they wanted me to use chinese balls (2) and move them in my hand.. that was impossible to do. That would be great if you can ask you doctors some questions. I dont get anywhere asking my questions to therapy and my doctor. It seems like they dance around the questions.

soberjo06@yahoo.com

Joann

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/08/23 at 8:35 am | In reply to Joann.

I do not know if they adjust tendons and such but I will ask my Doctor on Monday when I see them. My Doctor answers all of my questions however I often forget to ask the questions while I am there. This time I will have a few written down. My wrist and your wrist will never work the same as it was because they removed the three bones which contributed to 50% of the bending angle and made the complex joint workable .We now have a hinge that should bend maximum 50% of what your hand bend before . I am not in a brace anymore in my swelling goes down ever so slowly. My surgery was one hour and thirty minutes.

I do not know if they adjust tendons and such but I will ask my Doctor on Monday when I see them. My Doctor answers all of my questions however I often forget to ask the questions while I am there. This time I will have a few written down. My wrist and your wrist will never work the same as it was because they removed the three bones which contributed to 50% of the bending angle and made the complex joint workable .We now have a hinge that should bend maximum 50% of what your hand bend before . I am not in a brace anymore in my swelling goes down ever so slowly. My surgery was one hour and thirty minutes.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Joann

Submitted on 2013/08/23 at 8:19 am

I was put to sleep for my surgery. Before surgery they gave me 2 pain pills and 2 valuim. When I woke up I was in a splint using an ace bandage. After 7 days the stitches were removed. The splint was on too tight. I did not loosen it at all, I fugured that the doctor put it on so I left it the way he put it on. I was in a cast for 3 weeks. Now I wear a brace and have therapy twice a week. I still have swelling and pain. My wrist does not move the way it once did.
My job… I work for a food service company that prepares food for college students. My doctor released me to work one handed, but this company will not let me return to work because I can not lift 50 lbs. I have applied for disablity and should find out soon if I qualify for benefits. I had my surgery in Erie, Pa. I also have arthritis in my hand. I am right handed and it is the right hand that had surgery. I dont know if they froze my arm or used a block during surgery. I dont get my questions answered by the doctor or by therapy. Why won’t they answer my questions? I feel like they will not tell me if I will have full use of my hand. Is it true that they do adjust the tendons for this surgery? I know they have to move them to get to the bones that are being removed. My surgery was a one day surgery. I had the surgery in the morning and was sent home a few hours after.

I was put to sleep for my surgery. Before surgery they gave me 2 pain pills and 2 valuim. When I woke up I was in a splint using an ace bandage. After 7 days the stitches were removed. The splint was on too tight. I did not loosen it at all, I fugured that the doctor put it on so I left it the way he put it on. I was in a cast for 3 weeks. Now I wear a brace and have therapy twice a week. I still have swelling and pain. My wrist does not move the way it once did. My job… I work for a food service company that prepares food for college students. My doctor released me to work one handed, but this company will not let me return to work because I can not lift 50 lbs. I have applied for disablity and should find out soon if I qualify for benefits. I had my surgery in Erie, Pa. I also have arthritis in my hand. I am right handed and it is the right hand that had surgery. I dont know if they froze my arm or used a block during surgery. I dont get my questions answered by the doctor or by therapy. Why won’t they answer my questions? I feel like they will not tell me if I will have full use of my hand. Is it true that they do adjust the tendons for this surgery? I know they have to move them to get to the bones that are being removed. My surgery was a one day surgery. I had the surgery in the morning and was sent home a few hours after.

soberjo06@yahoo.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2013/08/23 at 6:55 am | In reply to Joann.

I understand your frustration since I’m going to it myself. However, I have a friend who had fallen a year and a half ago in the United States and broke his wrist. He was traveling on vacation and had travel insurance. The hospital at Ocean City wanted to put him under while they said his wrist but the insurance refused to pay for the anesthesiologist and told him to drive back to Canada and have the wrist set in a Canadian hospital. Obviously he had chosen the wrong insurance company and this should be a lesson to most people who travel that the cheapest price isn’t always the best. But, when he came back to Canada they had to read fractured his wrist and set it properly and this required him to be in a cast for nine weeks. I met him last week at a shopping center and he explained that he had very similar problems with his fingers. In fact it was his left hand and he is a guitarist. He said after one year he can start playing guitar but not all the chords such as the “F” Chord. He said he went through many months of exercising his fingers and waking up every morning with them stiff. It seems like you’ve had your operation one or two months before me. My fingers are still swollen and if you look at day sixty-two entry you can see my progress at this point. I do have an ache in my fingers during the day but not really a pain that I cannot live with. I think it’s because of the swelling and once the swelling is down that aching will go away (at least I hope so). Where did you have your operation? How long did you have your cast on? Did they freeze your arm for the operation (Nerve Block) or did you have a general? What is your cast too tight? What is your job that you cannot go back to?

I understand your frustration since I’m going to it myself. However, I have a friend who had fallen a year and a half ago in the United States and broke his wrist. He was traveling on vacation and had travel insurance. The hospital at Ocean City wanted to put him under while they said his wrist but the insurance refused to pay for the anesthesiologist and told him to drive back to Canada and have the wrist set in a Canadian hospital. Obviously he had chosen the wrong insurance company and this should be a lesson to most people who travel that the cheapest price isn’t always the best. But, when he came back to Canada they had to read fractured his wrist and set it properly and this required him to be in a cast for nine weeks. I met him last week at a shopping center and he explained that he had very similar problems with his fingers. In fact it was his left hand and he is a guitarist. He said after one year he can start playing guitar but not all the chords such as the "F" Chord. He said he went through many months of exercising his fingers and waking up every morning with them stiff. It seems like you’ve had your operation one or two months before me. My fingers are still swollen and if you look at day sixty-two entry you can see my progress at this point. I do have an ache in my fingers during the day but not really a pain that I cannot live with. I think it’s because of the swelling and once the swelling is down that aching will go away (at least I hope so). Where did you have your operation? How long did you have your cast on? Did they freeze your arm for the operation (Nerve Block) or did you have a general? What is your cast too tight? What is your job that you cannot go back to?

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/08/22 at 8:37 pm

I had a PRC done in may of this year. After surgery I was in so much pain I thought the pain would never end! My fingers were so swollen! I could not even hold a cotton ball!!! I had a cyst in a bone, the bone was factured, and the bone was dead. I still have swollen fingers and still have pain! I may never go back to my job because of this surgery.

I had a PRC done in may of this year. After surgery I was in so much pain I thought the pain would never end! My fingers were so swollen! I could not even hold a cotton ball!!! I had a cyst in a bone, the bone was factured, and the bone was dead. I still have swollen fingers and still have pain! I may never go back to my job because of this surgery.

soberjo06@yahoo.com

Joann

Mark

Submitted on 2013/08/22 at 1:56 pm | In reply to Andrea.

I have a couple places on this blog where I have told my story so I will try not to be too repetative. I had my PRC 10 days after Peter. Mine has not been as problematic as Peter’s. I was typing on a computer 3 or 4 days after the surgery. I was tying shoe laces a couple days after the surgery and I only took pain pills for a couple days after the surgery. Strange as it is, the fingers give the most discomfort but my fingers have not been as problematic as Peter’s fingers. I have one more session with my hand therapist but I’m still a long way from having my wrist back. It is a long, drawn out process that takes patience. I figure I’m still 2-4 months away from knowing what I will have for a left wrist (luckily I’m right handed). I pulled the trigger pretty quickly in getting the operation. There was only a 4 month span between when I first started feeling discomfort and having the surgery. I was resigned to the fact that my wrist was only going to get worse if I did nothing. My biggest concern was being able to golf again. Pretty minor in the big picture, I suppose. I have casually swung a club and although I’m not ready to golf yet, I do feel that I should be able to golf at some point in the next 2-4 months. I have no way of knowing for sure, but on some level I believe that so far my PRC recovery has gone pretty smoothly because I did not put off the decision to have the PRC.

You did not mention whether the doctor you have been talking to was a hand specialist. If you haven’t talked to a hand specialist, then I recommend that you do. I also recommend that you talk to a certified hand therapist (not just an occupational therapist or a physical therapist) that has dealt with PRC patients about life after the prc. A CHT might be able to give you some insight on the range of recovery you might expect and answer any specific questions you might have about being able to do specific motions.

One of the harder things for me was to get past the ‘this sucks’ phase and wondering why they can replace knees and hips but a little bone goes bad in the wrist and there are no options for getting back to ‘good as new’.

Good Luck.

I have a couple places on this blog where I have told my story so I will try not to be too repetative. I had my PRC 10 days after Peter. Mine has not been as problematic as Peter’s. I was typing on a computer 3 or 4 days after the surgery. I was tying shoe laces a couple days after the surgery and I only took pain pills for a couple days after the surgery. Strange as it is, the fingers give the most discomfort but my fingers have not been as problematic as Peter’s fingers. I have one more session with my hand therapist but I’m still a long way from having my wrist back. It is a long, drawn out process that takes patience. I figure I’m still 2-4 months away from knowing what I will have for a left wrist (luckily I’m right handed). I pulled the trigger pretty quickly in getting the operation. There was only a 4 month span between when I first started feeling discomfort and having the surgery. I was resigned to the fact that my wrist was only going to get worse if I did nothing. My biggest concern was being able to golf again. Pretty minor in the big picture, I suppose. I have casually swung a club and although I’m not ready to golf yet, I do feel that I should be able to golf at some point in the next 2-4 months. I have no way of knowing for sure, but on some level I believe that so far my PRC recovery has gone pretty smoothly because I did not put off the decision to have the PRC. You did not mention whether the doctor you have been talking to was a hand specialist. If you haven’t talked to a hand specialist, then I recommend that you do. I also recommend that you talk to a certified hand therapist (not just an occupational therapist or a physical therapist) that has dealt with PRC patients about life after the prc. A CHT might be able to give you some insight on the range of recovery you might expect and answer any specific questions you might have about being able to do specific motions. One of the harder things for me was to get past the ‘this sucks’ phase and wondering why they can replace knees and hips but a little bone goes bad in the wrist and there are no options for getting back to ‘good as new’. Good Luck.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2013/08/22 at 9:08 am | In reply to Nelson.

Having a PRC is certainly not one of the most pleasant things that life has to offer. However, the minute you have this procedure is the minute you begin to heal. I totally understand the relentless pain in your hand and wrist and how you must not look forward to having an operation. But the sooner you have it the sooner you will start on the road towards recovery. I have read many websites on this and it seems like 35% or more have little or no pain after the PRC and are fairly functional. I would recommend that you have the surgery performed by a hand specialist, micro surgeon who performs hand surgery on a regular basis as opposed to an orthopedic surgeon who may only do one or two of these procedures per year. If you’re in Canada I would suggest you contact the hand clinic in Toronto and if you’re in the US I would suggest you go to Louisville Kentucky where they seem to specialize in these type of operations for the hand. However I’m certain there are many amazing hand surgeons throughout the US and Canada that I am just not aware of. There is pain after the surgery and it does go away slowly. There are different procedures and different approaches after the surgery. For example in my case I woke up after surgery with a cast on and as my wrist and hand swelled it seemed to push the swelling up to my fingers which is really one of the major problems I have at the moment. I really never had severe pain in my wrist at all. It is now sixty days after the surgery and my wrist feels good although it will ache slightly at the end of the day but it is my fingers that are stiff and sore. I have good days and bad days with my fingers and I’ve spoken to many people who have had wrist surgery and/or broken/fractured wrists and many of them go through this because of the cast. With broken wrist there in a cast for eight weeks and one fellow told me it took six months to a year before he got his full range of motion in his fingers. I can do a lot more with my fingers today than yesterday or last week. I personally have no patience for healing so I would imagine I am a bit of a complainer since I feel I should be healed as quickly as my programmers can create a software program for sale. But this is certainly not the case. However I do notice every day that I can do something new. For example, yesterday I was able to wash under my left armpit with a bar of soap and move the bar up and down bending my wrist which is something I could not do up until yesterday.

So in conclusion, I would suggest you get yourself to a hospital and to a surgeon that you have faith in and have the PRC performed so that you can begin to heal. After all, you have pain today but you are not moving forward. In my opinion it’s better to be moving forward towards healing than to be suspended like you are right now. Please let us know what your decision is, where you’re having the procedure done and please check back with us afterwards and let us know your progress. I may eventually start different pages such as week one, week two and put people’s comments in so that we can see the variety of healing processes. I hope this is helpful and I’ve been told by many people that staying positive and looking forward is the key to overcoming this situation. One gentleman said that nobody picks a PRC and that a PRC picks you.

Having a PRC is certainly not one of the most pleasant things that life has to offer. However, the minute you have this procedure is the minute you begin to heal. I totally understand the relentless pain in your hand and wrist and how you must not look forward to having an operation. But the sooner you have it the sooner you will start on the road towards recovery. I have read many websites on this and it seems like 35% or more have little or no pain after the PRC and are fairly functional. I would recommend that you have the surgery performed by a hand specialist, micro surgeon who performs hand surgery on a regular basis as opposed to an orthopedic surgeon who may only do one or two of these procedures per year. If you’re in Canada I would suggest you contact the hand clinic in Toronto and if you’re in the US I would suggest you go to Louisville Kentucky where they seem to specialize in these type of operations for the hand. However I’m certain there are many amazing hand surgeons throughout the US and Canada that I am just not aware of. There is pain after the surgery and it does go away slowly. There are different procedures and different approaches after the surgery. For example in my case I woke up after surgery with a cast on and as my wrist and hand swelled it seemed to push the swelling up to my fingers which is really one of the major problems I have at the moment. I really never had severe pain in my wrist at all. It is now sixty days after the surgery and my wrist feels good although it will ache slightly at the end of the day but it is my fingers that are stiff and sore. I have good days and bad days with my fingers and I’ve spoken to many people who have had wrist surgery and/or broken/fractured wrists and many of them go through this because of the cast. With broken wrist there in a cast for eight weeks and one fellow told me it took six months to a year before he got his full range of motion in his fingers. I can do a lot more with my fingers today than yesterday or last week. I personally have no patience for healing so I would imagine I am a bit of a complainer since I feel I should be healed as quickly as my programmers can create a software program for sale. But this is certainly not the case. However I do notice every day that I can do something new. For example, yesterday I was able to wash under my left armpit with a bar of soap and move the bar up and down bending my wrist which is something I could not do up until yesterday. So in conclusion, I would suggest you get yourself to a hospital and to a surgeon that you have faith in and have the PRC performed so that you can begin to heal. After all, you have pain today but you are not moving forward. In my opinion it’s better to be moving forward towards healing than to be suspended like you are right now. Please let us know what your decision is, where you’re having the procedure done and please check back with us afterwards and let us know your progress. I may eventually start different pages such as week one, week two and put people’s comments in so that we can see the variety of healing processes. I hope this is helpful and I’ve been told by many people that staying positive and looking forward is the key to overcoming this situation. One gentleman said that nobody picks a PRC and that a PRC picks you.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Andrea

Submitted on 2013/08/21 at 8:09 pm

Hi, Just learned that I had KD on Tuesday. My lunate bone has collapsed completely and is dead wih no blood supply. Have been telling various doctors for 7 years that my wrist was paining and none of them diagonised it right till now . Was really shocked and upset at how bad it was
My doctor says to take some time and decide what I want to do, but am so confused about the options. I’m 34 yrs old, so he has advised waiting for as long as possible before I get a complete Wrist Fusion done. Hence he suggests I get a PRC done and have found your blog very helpful in making up my mind. It does sound like a world of pain and am hoping to delay it for as long as I can.
In the mean time till I decide he has suggested cortisone injections to manage the pain and wearing a wrist splint. So fed up with the constant pain.

Hi, Just learned that I had KD on Tuesday. My lunate bone has collapsed completely and is dead wih no blood supply. Have been telling various doctors for 7 years that my wrist was paining and none of them diagonised it right till now . Was really shocked and upset at how bad it was My doctor says to take some time and decide what I want to do, but am so confused about the options. I’m 34 yrs old, so he has advised waiting for as long as possible before I get a complete Wrist Fusion done. Hence he suggests I get a PRC done and have found your blog very helpful in making up my mind. It does sound like a world of pain and am hoping to delay it for as long as I can. In the mean time till I decide he has suggested cortisone injections to manage the pain and wearing a wrist splint. So fed up with the constant pain.

furtado.andrea@gmail.com

Andrea

Day 57 – A New Page | Proximal Row Carpectomy – PRC

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/08/15 at 4:43 pm | In reply to Nelson.

Hi,

I just made a post that perhaps will address some of your questions and I’m hoping that other people who are further along the process would also be able to send you some information.
I think if the PRC is successful and performed properly that you will be able to play with your kids and do most things that you did before. The biggest problem will be getting through the procedure and recovery stage the exercises and physiotherapy are important and they take over your life for what I imagine to be 3 to 4 months. I wish you luck with your PRC and all I can say is stay positive!

Hi, I just made a post that perhaps will address some of your questions and I’m hoping that other people who are further along the process would also be able to send you some information. <a href="https://proximalrowcarpectomy.com/2013/08/15/day-55-patience-is-a-virtue/&quot; title="Day 55 – Patience is a virtue…" rel="nofollow"></a> I think if the PRC is successful and performed properly that you will be able to play with your kids and do most things that you did before. The biggest problem will be getting through the procedure and recovery stage the exercises and physiotherapy are important and they take over your life for what I imagine to be 3 to 4 months. I wish you luck with your PRC and all I can say is stay positive!

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Nelson
price.nelson@gmail.com
209.193.41.50

Submitted on 2013/08/15 at 3:33 pm

Peter, thank you for creating this blog. It is very helpful to those of us like you who had no idea what a PRC was. I had a fusion of my lunate and triquetrum on May 1 and had previously had my scaphoid lunate ligament repaired. My next step is the PRC and unfortunately it looks like its going to happen as the fusion appears to be a non union after 15 weeks. I know every case is different, but I was wondering what your thoughts were on being able to return to an active status after PRC? I am still relatively young (late 30′s) and typically active in sports, and entertaining my three young children. Any advice or information you or your followers might have would be helpful and greatly appreciated.

Peter, thank you for creating this blog. It is very helpful to those of us like you who had no idea what a PRC was. I had a fusion of my lunate and triquetrum on May 1 and had previously had my scaphoid lunate ligament repaired. My next step is the PRC and unfortunately it looks like its going to happen as the fusion appears to be a non union after 15 weeks. I know every case is different, but I was wondering what your thoughts were on being able to return to an active status after PRC? I am still relatively young (late 30’s) and typically active in sports, and entertaining my three young children. Any advice or information you or your followers might have would be helpful and greatly appreciated.

price.nelson@gmail.com

Nelson

 

Mark

Submitted on 2013/08/12 at 2:55 pm

You are sounding kind of excited. Maybe seeing a hint of light at the end of the tunnel. I feel like I’m marking time a little bit, waiting for the go ahead to start applying a load to my wrist. I have been doing some sqeezing exercises and although they are not overly difficult, it does result in my wrist and fingers being very tight in the morning. Nothing I can’t get loosened up. But it is noticable. I meet with the surgeon on Thursday. I assume that they will take an x-ray. I also assume (hope), that my exercises will be expanded to include applying more strength to the wrist. In regards to inconsistencies with therapists, mine told me to never apply cold and to only apply heat if I intend to do my exercises right after. I have about 40-45 degrees of movement in the direction of the palm (forward) and 35-40 degrees in the other direction. In the forward direction, I think I’m about maxed out. There isn’t any pain in that direction. The movement just stops. There might still be some improvement in the other direction as the swelling around the scar continues to go down. My wrist, as a whole, still feels a little swelled/bloated, although I don’t feel like I’m pushing around as much fluid when I move it compared to a week or two ago. As far as grip strength, my PRC wrist is about 60% of my right wrist, which surprised me a little bit, and I think that can improve some once I get into some more strengthening exercises. I could probably get away with spending more time not wearing my brace except I have the fear that I will trip and fall and put my left arm out to catch myself. I would be very content if I could have the range of motion I have right now and be pain free.

You are sounding kind of excited. Maybe seeing a hint of light at the end of the tunnel. I feel like I’m marking time a little bit, waiting for the go ahead to start applying a load to my wrist. I have been doing some sqeezing exercises and although they are not overly difficult, it does result in my wrist and fingers being very tight in the morning. Nothing I can’t get loosened up. But it is noticable. I meet with the surgeon on Thursday. I assume that they will take an x-ray. I also assume (hope), that my exercises will be expanded to include applying more strength to the wrist. In regards to inconsistencies with therapists, mine told me to never apply cold and to only apply heat if I intend to do my exercises right after. I have about 40-45 degrees of movement in the direction of the palm (forward) and 35-40 degrees in the other direction. In the forward direction, I think I’m about maxed out. There isn’t any pain in that direction. The movement just stops. There might still be some improvement in the other direction as the swelling around the scar continues to go down. My wrist, as a whole, still feels a little swelled/bloated, although I don’t feel like I’m pushing around as much fluid when I move it compared to a week or two ago. As far as grip strength, my PRC wrist is about 60% of my right wrist, which surprised me a little bit, and I think that can improve some once I get into some more strengthening exercises. I could probably get away with spending more time not wearing my brace except I have the fear that I will trip and fall and put my left arm out to catch myself. I would be very content if I could have the range of motion I have right now and be pain free.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2013/08/09 at 2:43 pm

I agree and I am typing this with my fingers!! :) My fingers are getting much better and now working on the wrist and thumb.

I agree and I am typing this with my fingers!! 🙂 My fingers are getting much better and now working on the wrist and thumb.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Mark

Submitted on 2013/08/09 at 1:58 pm | In reply to Philip.

Philip, you don’t choose the PRC. The PRC chooses you. There is really nothing fair about it. And it is not something you can ‘hope’ away. I assume the issue is with your scaphoid and/or lunate bones. If they are indeed dead or dying, you realistically don’t have much choice in the matter. You don’t mention your age. If only the scaphoid is an issue, a 4 corner fusion might be an option. Based on what you have said, if you do nothing your wrist will become useless at some point due the the dead/dying bones breaking up. If you don’t do anything, you increase the chances of by passing the PRC altogether and going straight to a solid fused wrist. There really is not a whole lot of information on the internet in regards to actual people talking about their own experiences with PRC. Some of the little that I have read involves people ‘wondering if they should get a PRC’. Again, it’s really not something you choose. It chooses you.

My own experience, in a nut shell, is that one day I woke up with no indication of any potential left wrist problem. By the end of the day, my wrist felt mildly swollen and stiff for no apparent reason. After a couple months of steroids and NSAIDs, I had an MRI which showed a ligament missing from my scaphoid and only a portion of the bone was actually alive. I assume that the day my wrist first felt discomfort was the day the ligament came off the bone as a result of the bone being too dead to support it and the bone was no longer able to maintain the proper orientation in the wrist. I had the choice of 4 corner fusion or PRC. I chose PRC because the recovery is less involved and studies show that there really isn’t much difference in the end results. I had the surgery 1 July (4 months after first noticing discomfort in the wrist). I was in a cast until 18 July. Now I do daily range of motion exercises. I can’t do any lifting and such with the wrist because the new wrist structure has to reform it’s new pocket but I expect that in the next month or so I will be doing some strengthening exercises. I don’t expect to know for sure what I will have for a wrist for a couple more months. So far I have not had nearly the problems that Peter has had. I had functional use of my fingers within a day or two of the surgery. I only took pain pills for about two days after the surgery.

In summary, make sure you are talking to a hand surgeon. If there is a dead or dying bone in your wrist, I don’t think you have much of a choice in the matter.

Good Luck.

Philip, you don’t choose the PRC. The PRC chooses you. There is really nothing fair about it. And it is not something you can ‘hope’ away. I assume the issue is with your scaphoid and/or lunate bones. If they are indeed dead or dying, you realistically don’t have much choice in the matter. You don’t mention your age. If only the scaphoid is an issue, a 4 corner fusion might be an option. Based on what you have said, if you do nothing your wrist will become useless at some point due the the dead/dying bones breaking up. If you don’t do anything, you increase the chances of by passing the PRC altogether and going straight to a solid fused wrist. There really is not a whole lot of information on the internet in regards to actual people talking about their own experiences with PRC. Some of the little that I have read involves people ‘wondering if they should get a PRC’. Again, it’s really not something you choose. It chooses you. My own experience, in a nut shell, is that one day I woke up with no indication of any potential left wrist problem. By the end of the day, my wrist felt mildly swollen and stiff for no apparent reason. After a couple months of steroids and NSAIDs, I had an MRI which showed a ligament missing from my scaphoid and only a portion of the bone was actually alive. I assume that the day my wrist first felt discomfort was the day the ligament came off the bone as a result of the bone being too dead to support it and the bone was no longer able to maintain the proper orientation in the wrist. I had the choice of 4 corner fusion or PRC. I chose PRC because the recovery is less involved and studies show that there really isn’t much difference in the end results. I had the surgery 1 July (4 months after first noticing discomfort in the wrist). I was in a cast until 18 July. Now I do daily range of motion exercises. I can’t do any lifting and such with the wrist because the new wrist structure has to reform it’s new pocket but I expect that in the next month or so I will be doing some strengthening exercises. I don’t expect to know for sure what I will have for a wrist for a couple more months. So far I have not had nearly the problems that Peter has had. I had functional use of my fingers within a day or two of the surgery. I only took pain pills for about two days after the surgery. In summary, make sure you are talking to a hand surgeon. If there is a dead or dying bone in your wrist, I don’t think you have much of a choice in the matter. Good Luck.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2013/08/07 at 7:15 pm | In reply to Philip.

Actually, my hand was in a half cast from June 19 two July 5 at which time the cast was removed and I was given a hand brace much similar to those you can buy at Walmart. From July 5 to July 12 I was to where to brace all of the time except for once daily to wash my hand and stitches. From July 12 two July 30 I was to wear the brace but could take it off to do my exercises and/or when I was just watching TV or sitting around doing nothing special that could injure my wrist. After July 30 I was only to where to brace if I was to do something strenuous or if my hand was in danger of being knocked such as out in public malls. I now wear the hand sock that went under the brace when I go out just to let people know that my hand is injured. You can read about my injury on my blog at the following link: https://proximalrowcarpectomy.com/how-it-came-to-be/. In my particular case I had no choice since I had cracked my lunate bone and the lunate bone was dry, brittle and in fact dead. They could not repair the lunate bone so the only option was to remove the row. I must’ve injured the lunate bone years ago and this had resulted in a lack of blood flow to the lunate bone which caused it to die slowly over time. Once the bone was cracked, my wrist was swollen, sore and would not move. It was much like being on death row with no option but to move forward to that room. The surgery was not elective, it was not my choice, it was the only option available to me. However, it was my choice to seek out the best surgeon available in Canada to perform the operation.

It is now just under two months and my fingers are still a bit swollen and I am working on getting the fingers, thumb and wrist to move. Because of my choice of operation in Toronto which was far away my physiotherapy only started today in my local town. I now plan to go to fuse you three times a week as I do my exercises five times a day. I am a bit disappointed that I cannot get on my motorcycle and ride this summer and I am not certain if I will be able to ride comfortably when this is all said and done.

In your case the bone seem to be floating. You should confirm that they are not getting blood flow and are in fact dead and/or beyond repair [brittle]. If they are getting blood flow there may be some options that a specialist could do. But hey, I am not a specialist, I’m not a Doctor and I shouldn’t even make these types of comments.

In conclusion, there is nothing to fear about the operation but the recovery is a lot of work and you will learn to hate your physiotherapist and the exercises they prescribed. I do not personally have any patience, I understand it’s a virtue not seldom found in men and I therefore expect to heal overnight. This is not the case and I have some days that are better than others were my fingers and wrist is more or less swollen. In fact I’m not typing this reply, I am using my Dragon software to dictate it. I thought I would be typing again by now.

Please keep checking back with my blog and please feel free to fill us in on what you decide to do and how it goes. Thank you for your response in your comments…

Philip

Philip

Submitted on 2013/08/07 at 5:14 pm

I am trying to decide whether to have the PRC. I tore 2 of the ligaments in my right hand some time back and didn’t realize it until it was to late to repair the ligaments. The bones are just sort of floating in my wrist. The doc says I will develop really bad arthritis If I don’t do this. It has been 2 years since he told me that and I am starting to get pain and loss of strength in that hand. I saw you were only in a cast for 2 weeks. I was told 6 to 8 weeks in a cast. Also, if you don’t mind my asking, why did you need the surgery and what were your symptoms?

I am trying to decide whether to have the PRC. I tore 2 of the ligaments in my right hand some time back and didn’t realize it until it was to late to repair the ligaments. The bones are just sort of floating in my wrist. The doc says I will develop really bad arthritis If I don’t do this. It has been 2 years since he told me that and I am starting to get pain and loss of strength in that hand. I saw you were only in a cast for 2 weeks. I was told 6 to 8 weeks in a cast. Also, if you don’t mind my asking, why did you need the surgery and what were your symptoms?

philiplfritz@gmail.com

Philip

Select comment
Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

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Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2013/08/05 at 5:05 pm | In reply to Nancy Foster.

Hi,

I have been performing the required exercises 8 times a day. I think they needed to thirty days for the wrist to properly heal after surgery since I had a PRC before I start really working on the wrist part. I suppose I will be doing three times a week at the physiotherapist. I start in two days. The physiotherapist at the hospital will be contacting my local physiotherapist in Cornwall just to make clear the process and what is expected between now and my next visit in thirty days to the surgeon in Toronto.

Thanks, ________________________

Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com

Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________

Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

Hi, I have been performing the required exercises 8 times a day. I think they needed to thirty days for the wrist to properly heal after surgery since I had a PRC before I start really working on the wrist part. I suppose I will be doing three times a week at the physiotherapist. I start in two days. The physiotherapist at the hospital will be contacting my local physiotherapist in Cornwall just to make clear the process and what is expected between now and my next visit in thirty days to the surgeon in Toronto. Thanks, ________________________ Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________ Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Nancy Foster
https://www.facebook.com/nancynfoster

Submitted on 2013/08/05 at 4:45 pm

All sounding good, except it sounds like you are not seeing the hand therapist very often ?? From my own experience and hand surgeon’s orders, two to three times per week with hand therapist is required for best outcome :)

All sounding good, except it sounds like you are not seeing the hand therapist very often ?? From my own experience and hand surgeon’s orders, two to three times per week with hand therapist is required for best outcome 🙂

nnfoster@gmail.com

Nancy Foster

https://www.facebook.com/nancynfoster

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner
vespaadventures.ca

Submitted on 2013/07/25 at 8:14 pm | In reply to Nancy Foster.

I have exercises to do since I only got the cast off two weeks ago and my surgeon did not want physiotherapy at the moment. I am returning to visit the surgeon and the physiotherapist in Toronto in four days on July 30. They have given the exercises which I have to do five times a day. The physiotherapist in Toronto calls me regularly and reviews my videos that I put on this blog. The problem is that I live in a small town and I do not think there is a hand specialist locally. I am assuming that after my visit next Tuesday I will be given further exercises to do and they may consult with a local physiotherapist whom I can visit 2 to 3 times a week. I think the surgeon wanted my wrist to heal a bit more before starting to physiotherapy on the wrist. My problem at the moment is my fingers since they wanted these fingers to work properly before my next visit. Although they have improved considerably with the exercises I have been doing, I still cannot fully open my fingers. I am very anxious for my next visit since they will take an x-ray and will give me my next set of marching orders. Additionally, I have many questions for the surgeon.

I have exercises to do since I only got the cast off two weeks ago and my surgeon did not want physiotherapy at the moment. I am returning to visit the surgeon and the physiotherapist in Toronto in four days on July 30. They have given the exercises which I have to do five times a day. The physiotherapist in Toronto calls me regularly and reviews my videos that I put on this blog. The problem is that I live in a small town and I do not think there is a hand specialist locally. I am assuming that after my visit next Tuesday I will be given further exercises to do and they may consult with a local physiotherapist whom I can visit 2 to 3 times a week. I think the surgeon wanted my wrist to heal a bit more before starting to physiotherapy on the wrist. My problem at the moment is my fingers since they wanted these fingers to work properly before my next visit. Although they have improved considerably with the exercises I have been doing, I still cannot fully open my fingers. I am very anxious for my next visit since they will take an x-ray and will give me my next set of marching orders. Additionally, I have many questions for the surgeon.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Nancy Foster

Submitted on 2013/07/25 at 8:03 pm

hi,

Have been following your blog with interest. I had a total wrist replacement last year as a PRC was deemed to not be sufficient.

Two questions: 1- are you seeing a certified hand therapist ? Makes a world of difference to see a CHT instead of a regular therapist. 2- sounds like you do not see the therapist too often ? For best outcome, you should be seeing the therapist 2 or 3 times a week

Best of luck as you continue to improve. It is slow and frustrating, but improvement does come

Best, Nancy

hi, Have been following your blog with interest. I had a total wrist replacement last year as a PRC was deemed to not be sufficient. Two questions: 1- are you seeing a certified hand therapist ? Makes a world of difference to see a CHT instead of a regular therapist. 2- sounds like you do not see the therapist too often ? For best outcome, you should be seeing the therapist 2 or 3 times a week Best of luck as you continue to improve. It is slow and frustrating, but improvement does come Best, Nancy

nnfoster@gmail.com

Nancy Foster

Sarah

Submitted on 2013/07/21 at 5:49 pm

Thank you for creating this blog! I just had this procedure done on Monday, so having a place to go for support is very helpful! Stay positive! Keep doing your exercises. I had a surgery on this same wrist in November last year and I went through the same type of struggles you are having with not seeing improvements in the exercises. It is a very frustrating and long process. Just stick with it. I have high hopes that you will ride your bike again!

Thanks again for blogging!

Thank you for creating this blog! I just had this procedure done on Monday, so having a place to go for support is very helpful! Stay positive! Keep doing your exercises. I had a surgery on this same wrist in November last year and I went through the same type of struggles you are having with not seeing improvements in the exercises. It is a very frustrating and long process. Just stick with it. I have high hopes that you will ride your bike again! Thanks again for blogging!

snwb76@gmail.com

Sarah

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2013/07/18 at 8:13 am | In reply to Mark.

Hi,

Thank you for the update and please do continue to send me any positive or negative updates with your progress. I have two small incisions which seems to be a newer approach to doing the PRC. Apparently one of the bones comes out easier when they go in through the area below to thumb. Yes I was not able to move my wrist before the operation because of the crack lunate and the swelling. However I do think that the cast was too tight which has slowed down my finger recovery. I chose to have the surgery done in Toronto which is 300 miles away from my home. I stayed in Toronto for two days to make sure that all was well before I went home. I did call in question some of the pain but they did explained that I had three bones removed from my wrist and it may be painful. I think if I was closer I would have gone in to have it examined and perhaps they would have put me in a new cast less tight. But I’m out of my cast now and I am not wearing the splint during the day while I’m at home. My fingers are progressing ever so slowly to my liking since I’d want to be driving my 300 GTV Vespa, but that is not happening.

I’m glad for you that your fingers are not an issue and that you can focus simply on your wrist. Are you in Canada or the USA?

Thanks, ________________________

Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com

Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________

Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

Hi, Thank you for the update and please do continue to send me any positive or negative updates with your progress. I have two small incisions which seems to be a newer approach to doing the PRC. Apparently one of the bones comes out easier when they go in through the area below to thumb. Yes I was not able to move my wrist before the operation because of the crack lunate and the swelling. However I do think that the cast was too tight which has slowed down my finger recovery. I chose to have the surgery done in Toronto which is 300 miles away from my home. I stayed in Toronto for two days to make sure that all was well before I went home. I did call in question some of the pain but they did explained that I had three bones removed from my wrist and it may be painful. I think if I was closer I would have gone in to have it examined and perhaps they would have put me in a new cast less tight. But I’m out of my cast now and I am not wearing the splint during the day while I’m at home. My fingers are progressing ever so slowly to my liking since I’d want to be driving my 300 GTV Vespa, but that is not happening. I’m glad for you that your fingers are not an issue and that you can focus simply on your wrist. Are you in Canada or the USA? Thanks, ________________________ Peter Sanderson Peter.Sanderson@outlook.com Home: (613) 933-3055 Work: (613) 577-4417 ________________________ Effective September 28, 2012 – Please update your records to change my personal e-mail from peterpq3@hotmail.com to peter.sanderson@outlook.com – Thank You ☺

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://www.vespaadventures.ca

Mark

Submitted on 2013/07/18 at 8:05 am | In reply to Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner.

I did not have any kind of nerve block. Once I got into the operating room they injected something into the IV and I remember getting strapped down on the table and then the next thing I vaguely remember is explaining to a nurse how tough I was after the surgery was over. They did not put me into a cast right away. The first week I had a splint/wrap combination. Nothing I could take off. But it was not really tight. A week after the surgery they put my wrist in a cast. For me, they removed the bones through a 2-3 inch opening on the back side of my wrist. No cut was made on the palm side of my wrist. It sounds like your wrist was in worse shape at the time of the operation compared to mine. I could move my wrist ok (with some pain), but if I tried to put a load on it that was not in line with my forearm it could hurt a lot. I’m hoping that because I had the surgery rather quickly compared to when the discomfort started, that will somehow work in my favor in the long run. I’m right handed and had the operation on my left wrist, by the way.

I did not have any kind of nerve block. Once I got into the operating room they injected something into the IV and I remember getting strapped down on the table and then the next thing I vaguely remember is explaining to a nurse how tough I was after the surgery was over. They did not put me into a cast right away. The first week I had a splint/wrap combination. Nothing I could take off. But it was not really tight. A week after the surgery they put my wrist in a cast. For me, they removed the bones through a 2-3 inch opening on the back side of my wrist. No cut was made on the palm side of my wrist. It sounds like your wrist was in worse shape at the time of the operation compared to mine. I could move my wrist ok (with some pain), but if I tried to put a load on it that was not in line with my forearm it could hurt a lot. I’m hoping that because I had the surgery rather quickly compared to when the discomfort started, that will somehow work in my favor in the long run. I’m right handed and had the operation on my left wrist, by the way.

markwinter@roadrunner.com

Mark

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

Submitted on 2013/07/17 at 4:24 pm | In reply to Mark.

Hi,
did they freeze your arm with a nerve block? I think part of my problem was that the cast was too tight and perhaps my arm was extra frozen because they did have problems freezing it. Apparently my nerves were unusual and when they said I was ready to go I could still move my last two fingers on my hand. They went back and froze some more under my armpits. I don’t know if that’s the reason or not. Additionally, my lunate bone was cracked and was in a few pieces. My wrist was very swollen and sore at the time of the operation.

I am now one week and a bit since the cast was removed and I’m moving my fingers much better however my thumb is still tight. My wrist movement seems to go inwards towards the inside of my wrist but will not move in the opposite direction yet. I see my doctor again and the physiotherapist on July 30.

Hi, did they freeze your arm with a nerve block? I think part of my problem was that the cast was too tight and perhaps my arm was extra frozen because they did have problems freezing it. Apparently my nerves were unusual and when they said I was ready to go I could still move my last two fingers on my hand. They went back and froze some more under my armpits. I don’t know if that’s the reason or not. Additionally, my lunate bone was cracked and was in a few pieces. My wrist was very swollen and sore at the time of the operation. I am now one week and a bit since the cast was removed and I’m moving my fingers much better however my thumb is still tight. My wrist movement seems to go inwards towards the inside of my wrist but will not move in the opposite direction yet. I see my doctor again and the physiotherapist on July 30.

peter.sanderson@outlook.com

Peter Sanderson, Software Developer, Consultant & Vespa Owner

http://peterpq3.wordpress.com

Mark
markwinter@roadrunner.com
199.96.153.92

Submitted on 2013/07/17 at 3:46 pm

I appreciate the effort that you are going through to document your journey. I had my PRC done 1 July. Finding your blog gives me a little bit of a glimpse into the future in regards to what to expect. My PRC was the result of a ligament coming off my scaphoid and the scaphpoid being partially dead. I had the option of a 4 corner fusion, but chose the PRC. From first wrist discomfort to PRC was 4 months. I’m still trying to get my mind wrapped around this whole thing. I’m still in a cast, but that will come off tomorrow. I’m a little anxious about getting the cast off and trying to move my wrist. Unlike yourself, I was able to move my fingers within hours of the surgery with only very slight discomfort in the knuckles and finger joints. Pain in my wrist has been virtually non-existant so far. I took pain pills for a couple days, but after that any discomfort was not worth taking a pill for. Good luck to you and I look forward to reading your blog to see what my future might hold.

4 Comments
  1. steve permalink

    I had the PRC surgery on Oct the 23rd, now it’s day 6, still much pain in simple movements. I do have a follow up on Nov. 5th. Really frustrated at this point simply because I am very impatient. I live in southern Indiana and had the surgery conducted in Louisville at Norton’s. If anyone has had the same, either recent or earlier, please e-mail me with your progress at svatsula@yahoo.com for I do not really know what lays ahead. Thank you

  2. Andrea permalink

    Hi, Just learned that I had KD on Tuesday. My lunate bone has collapsed completely and is dead wih no blood supply. Have been telling various doctors for 7 years that my wrist was paining and none of them diagonised it right till now . Was really shocked and upset at how bad it was
    My doctor says to take some time and decide what I want to do, but am so confused about the options. I’m 34 yrs old, so he has advised waiting for as long as possible before I get a complete Wrist Fusion done. Hence he suggests I get a PRC done and have found your blog very helpful in making up my mind. It does sound like a world of pain and am hoping to delay it for as long as I can.
    In the mean time till I decide he has suggested cortisone injections to manage the pain and wearing a wrist splint. So fed up with the constant pain.

    • Mark permalink

      I have a couple places on this blog where I have told my story so I will try not to be too repetative. I had my PRC 10 days after Peter. Mine has not been as problematic as Peter’s. I was typing on a computer 3 or 4 days after the surgery. I was tying shoe laces a couple days after the surgery and I only took pain pills for a couple days after the surgery. Strange as it is, the fingers give the most discomfort but my fingers have not been as problematic as Peter’s fingers. I have one more session with my hand therapist but I’m still a long way from having my wrist back. It is a long, drawn out process that takes patience. I figure I’m still 2-4 months away from knowing what I will have for a left wrist (luckily I’m right handed). I pulled the trigger pretty quickly in getting the operation. There was only a 4 month span between when I first started feeling discomfort and having the surgery. I was resigned to the fact that my wrist was only going to get worse if I did nothing. My biggest concern was being able to golf again. Pretty minor in the big picture, I suppose. I have casually swung a club and although I’m not ready to golf yet, I do feel that I should be able to golf at some point in the next 2-4 months. I have no way of knowing for sure, but on some level I believe that so far my PRC recovery has gone pretty smoothly because I did not put off the decision to have the PRC.

      You did not mention whether the doctor you have been talking to was a hand specialist. If you haven’t talked to a hand specialist, then I recommend that you do. I also recommend that you talk to a certified hand therapist (not just an occupational therapist or a physical therapist) that has dealt with PRC patients about life after the prc. A CHT might be able to give you some insight on the range of recovery you might expect and answer any specific questions you might have about being able to do specific motions.

      One of the harder things for me was to get past the ‘this sucks’ phase and wondering why they can replace knees and hips but a little bone goes bad in the wrist and there are no options for getting back to ‘good as new’.

      Good Luck.

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